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Patrick Hall, Catherine Needham and Kate Hamblin

This chapter explores social care, a relatively new concept in UK social policy as ‘care’ was traditionally a private, household concern, and ‘adult social care’ only became a distinctive policy area in 2005 when children’s and adults’ services were separated. The chapter’s focus is state-provided social care services, which in the UK are both needs and means-tested and encompass a range of support, including care in residential and home settings, and services to maximize community participation. The chapter addresses key concepts that have shaped social care policy in the UK in recent years, including prevention, person-centredness, asset-based approaches and well-being. It also examines the current policy landscape in the UK’s four nations, including debates related to the funding of social care, taking in examples from other countries that are similarly facing challenges related to an ageing population and increasing demands on care systems. The integration of health and social care systems is also discussed in the chapter, including the differences between the four UK nations and the barriers and obstacles integration faces.

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Sarah Harper, Kate Hamblin, Jaco Hoffman, Kenneth Howse and George Leeson

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Sarah Harper, Kate Hamblin, Jaco Hoffman, Kenneth Howse and George Leeson

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Sarah Harper, Kate Hamblin, Jaco Hoffman, Kenneth Howse and George Leeson

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Sarah Harper, Kate Hamblin, Jaco Hoffman, Kenneth Howse and George Leeson

The International Handbook on Ageing and Public Policy explores the challenges arising from the ageing of populations across the globe for government, policy makers, the private sector and civil society. It examines various national state approaches to welfare provisions for older people, and highlights alternatives based around the voluntary and third-party sector, families and private initiatives. The Handbook is highly relevant for academics interested in this critical issue, and offers important messages for policy makers and practitioners.