You are looking at 1 - 10 of 47 items

  • Author or Editor: Larry Kreiser x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Hans Sprohge and Larry Kreiser

In the United States (U.S.), subsidies and tax preferences for generating electricity from nuclear energy provide incentives for creating difficult to remediate environmental damage. Nuclear energy is erroneously claimed by proponents as an environmentally friendly way to meet the country’s energy needs. Energy can be extracted from atoms either through fusion or fission. Theoretically, energy from fusion is limitless without any environmental consequences. The problem is that energy from fusion is not possible under current technology. Although it is true that the process of fission per se does not emit any greenhouse gases, it is not true that electricity generated by nuclear power plants is environmentally friendly. Over their life cycle, nuclear power plants emit greenhouse gases. The worst threat is posed by radiation from nuclear power plant accidents and from nuclear waste. Countless studies about the impact of this radiation on human health and the environment are contradictory. Some studies assert that the impact is not all that bad; other studies assert that the impact is devastating. Determining which position is correct is a difficult task. In light of the known and contradictory claims about the environmental and human health impact of nuclear energy, the issue in the U.S. is whether any new nuclear power plants should be granted subsidies and tax incentives. Prudence suggests erring on the side of caution. The chapter commences by first explaining the essence of nuclear energy and then examining the advantages and disadvantages of fusion and fission; subsequently, the chapter examines the U.S. nuclear industry, its subsidies, tax incentives and environmental effects.

You do not have access to this content

Hans Sprohge and Larry Kreiser

Zero emission credits (ZECs) are subsidies only to ageing nuclear power plants unable to compete in the marketplace due to low natural gas prices. State legislatures in Illinois and New York have approved up to $10 billion in ZECs subsidies over the next decade. Lawmakers contemplating enacting ZECs for ageing nuclear power plants unable to compete in the marketplace face contradictory information. Lawmakers cannot rely on contradictory conclusions when deciding on whether to enact ZECs. What lawmakers need to consider are the risks that enacting ZECs may exacerbate, by extending the operating life of nuclear power plants, nuclear meltdowns, cyberattacks, and terrorist attacks on nuclear waste. In light of these risks, extending the life of ageing nuclear power plants by enacting ZECs is irresponsible and shortsighted.

This content is available to you

Edited by Larry Kreiser, David Duff, Janet E. Milne and Hope Ashiabor

This content is available to you

Edited by Larry Kreiser, David Duff, Janet E. Milne and Hope Ashiabor

You do not have access to this content

Bill Butcher, Hans Sprohge, Rahmat Tavallali and Larry Kreiser

You do not have access to this content

Market Based Instruments

National Experiences in Environmental Sustainability

Edited by Larry Kreiser, David Duff, Janet E. Milne and Hope Ashiabor

This detailed book explores how market based environmental strategies are used in various countries around the world. It investigates how successful sustainability strategies used by one country can be transferred and used successfully in other countries, with a minimum of new research and experimentation. Leading environmental taxation scholars discuss this question and analyse a set of key case studies.
You do not have access to this content

Hans Sprohge, Bill Butcher, Mary Margaret Callison and Larry Kreiser

This content is available to you

Edited by Larry Kreiser, Julsuchada Sirisom, Hope Ashiabor and Janet E. Milne

This content is available to you

Edited by Larry Kreiser, Julsuchada Sirisom, Hope Ashiabor and Janet E. Milne