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Linne Marie Lauesen

Research in corporate social responsibility (CSR) literature that uses ethnographic methods based on newer studies shows that ethnographic studies are typically used to get ‘under the skin’ of corporations and their interpretation and use (and misuse) of CSR. Most companies utilize the good motives of CSR for corporate branding, to obtain legitimacy and to form their identity according to be ‘a good corporation’ in the eyes of its stakeholders. However, these ethnographic studies show how corporations are not always aligned with the intentions of CSR, because their motives are typically steered by making profits as a primer, in which CSR becomes a means to this end, which is not the purpose of CSR eventually. Ethnographic research methods are splendid for in-depth studies of one or a few organizations for explorative and discursive studies of CSR suggesting new theory development. However, it would be an interesting approach to engage ethnographic studies with quantitative approaches in order to come further up the ladder of actually imposing that the findings from case studies can be found in more than one company/business sector (the studied one) – maybe even be statistically significant. Such mixed method studies can suggest new theory grounded on in-depth findings of a few examples, and if these findings should be verified or generalizable, it needs a quantitative (statistical, significant) doubling.

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Linne Marie Lauesen

Storytelling is a method for improved writing styles often used in fiction, drama, movies, and disciplines that work with a storyline. Academic writing has often been claiming that it differs from stories by its factual content. However, to convince its highly skilled readers, a proper storyline is also needed for the communicating part of writing scientific papers, books, or presentations. Thus, storytelling is as vital for scientific writing as well. This chapter shows the mechanisms of the Narrative Arc with examples from the literature in corporate social responsibility in order to make readers reflect upon their communicative performance. It aims to provide a tool to improve the writing skills of academic writers regardless of research methods.

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David Crowther and Linne Marie Lauesen