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Lize A.E. Booysen and Heather Wishik

This chapter compares lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) rights, politics and workplace inclusion in South Africa (SA) and the USA. We explore the histories, backgrounds and legal landscapes of LGBTQ rights, and highlight relevant trends and current issues pertaining to LGBTQ issues in the two countries. We utilize Reynaud’s theory of social regulation (1979) to analyze social regulation involved in LGBTQ equal opportunities and inclusion, in historical, current coalitions and political debates in the two countries. We conclude that SA has a higher level of national control regulation than the USA, with more laws of national scope in place creating a broad pattern of progressive legislation towards LGBTQ equality. Regarding the autonomous societal rules activated spontaneously by actors, we conclude that the USA has taken the lead over SA in the relatively widespread acceptance of LGBTQ people in American society and in broad voluntary employer action. We found there is no straight line of progress in advancing LGBTQ rights, in either the USA or SA. We recommend that SA should build stronger cooperative ties beyond Africa to increase gay and lesbian social acceptance and to prevent anti-gay and lesbian violence. In the USA more formal regulation at the federal level is needed, where federal law addresses full LGBTQ rights and where federal court decisions affirm rights to constitutional equal protection in all arenas of life.

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Edited by Lize A.E. Booysen, Regine Bendl and Judith K. Pringle

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Lize A.E. Booysen, Judith K. Pringle and Regine Bendl

This chapter introduces the purpose, audience, structure and content of the 22 chapter edited volume, Handbook of Research Methods on Diversity Management, Equality and Inclusion at Work. It gives a short overview of EDI research and discourses, and concludes that common qualitative and quantitative research approaches fall far short of addressing the challenges of EDI research and have to be re-visited and even reinvented to further explain the complex processes of EDI. This Handbook addresses the aforementioned gap, represents the distillation of knowledge of the empirical EDI discourse and aims to become a benchmark volume that synthesises existing EDI literature, helping to define and shape the present and future EDI research and discourse. This Handbook is organised into three parts, ‘Part I Research dilemmas in EDI’, ‘Part II Methodology and methods for collecting EDI material’ and ‘Part III Methods and techniques for EDI data analysis’.

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Judith K. Pringle and Lize A.E. Booysen

This chapter gives a short historical review of research methods including a discussion of ontology (science of the nature of truth), epistemology (science of knowing), axiology (science of the nature of value and ethics) and methodology (science of research methods). Other definitional issues such as research approaches, paradigms, methods and techniques are clarified and defined. Rather than focusing on the artificial distinction between quantitative and qualitative research approaches, this chapter uses research paradigms as the organising principle. To that effect it gives a cursory overview of the major research paradigms, namely, positivist and post positivist, interpretivist/constructivist, post-structuralist/postmodern and critical/radical/transformative paradigms, emerging paradigms, such as Kaupapa M_ori, plus some pragmatic paradigm mixing possibilities. The applicability of each of these research paradigms for EDI research is discussed, followed by the way forward for EDI research, which sets the stage for the rest of the chapters.

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Edited by Lize A.E. Booysen, Regine Bendl and Judith K. Pringle

Equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI) have become features of organizations as a result of both legal and societal advances, as well as neoliberal economic reasoning and considerations. Current research approaches frequently fall short of addressing the challenges faced in EDI research, and this benchmark Handbook brings up to date coverage of research methods in EDI, and advances the development of research in the field.
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Lize A.E. Booysen and Stella M. Nkomo

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Lize A.E. Booysen, Gwendolyn Combs and Waheeda Lillevik

This chapter compares workplace equality legislation regarding marginalized groups, such as women, persons with disabilities, LGBTQ identity and racial/ethnic populations in Brazil, South Africa and the USA. It also contrasts these policies against each nation’s historical, social, political and legal contexts, and outlines future directions. These three countries share similar historical experiences in the positioning of power differentials between ruling classes, indigenous groups and those subjugated to legacies of inequality. In Brazil and the US the legacy of slavery endures, and in South Africa the vestiges of apartheid remains. All three countries still battle the influences of these measures on equity, diversity and inclusion of racial/ethnic and gender groups, and continue to struggle with the outcomes of everyday experiences of equality. Legislation aimed at anti-discrimination, promoting gender equality, disability and racial ethnic diversity varies between the countries, but is in existence. The concept of affirmative action is employed in each country in varying forms. Brazil imposes specific quotas for the employment of the disabled and women in certain areas. South Africa also has established quotas in the employment and training of designated groups – blacks, coloreds, Indians, women and the disabled – and in ownership, shareholding. Conversely, in the USA, affirmative action is used as a mechanism for achieving equality for racial/ethnic minorities, women and persons with disabilities, and quota systems are considered unconstitutional.

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Lize A.E. Booysen and Stella M. Nkomo

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International Handbook on Diversity Management at Work

Second Edition Country Perspectives on Diversity and Equal Treatment

Edited by Alain Klarsfeld, Lize A.E. Booysen, Eddy Ng, Ian Roper and Ahu Tatli

The second edition of this important reference work provides important updates and new perspectives on the cases constituting the first edition, as well as including contributions from a number of new countries: Australia, Finland, Japan, New Zealand, Nigeria and Russia. Countries that have been updated and expanded are Austria, Canada, France, India, Italy, the Netherlands, South Africa, and the United Kingdom.
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Alain Klarsfeld, Lize A.E. Booysen, Eddy Ng, Ian Roper and Ahu Tatli