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Lorraine Elliott

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Lorraine Elliott

Taking as its starting point the importance of ensuring that those who seek refuge in Europe are both protected and empowered, this chapter focuses on reclaiming a people-centred ethics of human security. It begins by exploring how human security and refugee rights have been framed as ethical concerns in a global public policy context. The second section demonstrates how critical approaches to human security demand cosmopolitan harm conventions that protect those who are most vulnerable to suffering and distress. Against this normative backdrop, the chapter argues that the kinds of securitization discourses that have become common to refugee policy practice actually encode a politics of invisibility and (non)recognition. The final section offers some thoughts on ways to ensure that refugee policy and strategies for intervention are grounded in a commitment to emancipation and dignity.

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Lorraine Elliott

Transnational environmental crime, along with the range of enabling and convergent crimes that make practices such as the illegal wildlife trade and timber trafficking possible, are usually assumed to be deeply intertwined with state weakness and weak states. This chapter examines these assumptions against the backdrop of contemporary debates about statebuilding and intervention. It uncovers multiple versions of the state and associated intervention strategies embedded in public policy responses to the challenges of transnational environmental crime. In doing so, it provides a critique of strategies of intervention (in this case against transnational criminality) that seek to replicate the practices of strong states in an orthodox Weberian sense.

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Edited by Lorraine Elliott and William H. Schaedla

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Edited by Lorraine Elliott and William H. Schaedla

This content is available to you

Lorraine Elliott and William H. Schaedla