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The Art of Mooting

Theories, Principles and Practice

Mark Thomas and Lucy Cradduck

This book examines the theories relevant to the development of skills necessary for effective participation in competition moots. By consideration of underlying theories the authors develop unique models of the skills of the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains and effective team dynamics; and emphasise the importance of written submissions. The authors use this analysis to develop a unique integrated model that informs the process of coaching moot teams according to reliable principles.
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Mark Thomas and Lucy Cradduck

This chapter places mooting in the context of current legal practice and emphasises the place of the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains; team dynamics; and written and oral advocacy to effective moot performance. It introduces the reader to the world of competition mooting and identifies the skills that require specific development to be an effective mooter.

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Mark Thomas and Lucy Cradduck

This chapter develops a model of the cognitive domain in a Bloom-Krathwohl-style matrix. Building from the specific levels identified by Bloom, and their interrelation with each other, the authors adapt these to the specific context of mooting. Engaging with existing literature and examples from sport, theatre and music, the authors develop a specific model that can be used for developing mooting-specific cognitive skills.

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Mark Thomas and Lucy Cradduck

This chapter explores the psychomotor skills associated with governing oral moot performance. It connects mooting’s psychomotor domain to mooting’s cognitive domain and explores how the two domains and their skill sets are interrelated and mutually dependent. Engaging with limited existing literature, the authors develop a taxonomy that can be used to support the development of mooting specific psychomotor skills.

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Mark Thomas and Lucy Cradduck

This chapter identifies the place of the affective domain in relation to mooting. It engages in a discussion of the issues associated with the highly stressful environment in which competitive mooting (and legal advocacy) operates and how to overcome these. The authors develop a mooting-specific model of affective skills, describe their interaction with the skills of the cognitive and psychomotor domains, and develop a model by which these skills can be mastered to maximise oral performance.

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Mark Thomas and Lucy Cradduck

This chapter explains the core role of the moot coach. As with the development or improvement of any skill set, mooting-specific skills are best developed with the assistance and involvement of an informed coach. The authors identify the role of the moot coach in competition mooting, and explain how a moot coach can work to build their own skills to maximise their teams’ written and oral performances.

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Mark Thomas and Lucy Cradduck

This chapter develops a mooting-specific model of team dynamics and describes its interaction with the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains and the role of the moot coach in its development. The authors present their taxonomy of the development of team dynamics as relevant to mooting.

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Mark Thomas and Lucy Cradduck

This chapter considers the importance of written submission to mooting advocacy. It presents an analysis of the requirements of specific writing styles, drawing in particular upon the example of an appellant moot competition. The relevance, differing types, and importance of written submissions to a moot team will be considered. The authors develop a mooting-specific model of writing, describing its interaction with the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains, and its impact on the written submissions of team dynamics.

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Mark Thomas and Lucy Cradduck

This chapter develops the hierarchical questioning structures for mooting preparation pre-competition. The authors focus on the development of questions for mooters ‘in rehearsal’, which correlate specifically to the authors’ model of cognitive functioning as it relates to the development of mooting skills. This development is linked specifically to the process of preparation of a team for the 2017 ICC Moot oral rounds.

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Mark Thomas and Lucy Cradduck

This chapter links with the taxonomies and models developed by the authors, as well as with relevant educational theories and principles, to create a model by which mooter performance may be critically assessed, and against which areas requiring development may be identified with specificity. As an aid to moot coaches, and academics, sample assessment materials are provided.