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Luke McDonagh

This chapter examines how music is defined and protected under copyright law with a focus on traditional music, and outlines the reasons why, even if their music is protectable, traditional musicians might decide not to enforce copyright in their works. While there is space for some use of innovative licensing, inspired by FOSS and Creative Commons, it should not be viewed as a panacea; instead, acknowledgement and maintenance of the social norms within traditional music communities are of vital importance, rather than dramatic legal changes. The particular jurisdiction I focus on is the UK, but the underlying principles of the chapter are relevant to copyright elsewhere, for example in the EU, the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

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Luke McDonagh

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Luke McDonagh

This content is available to you

Luke McDonagh

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Luke McDonagh

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Luke McDonagh

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Luke McDonagh

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Luke McDonagh