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Maarten Keune

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Maarten Keune

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Paul Marginson and Maarten Keune

Almost 20 years ago the Maastricht Treaty introduced procedures for European social dialogue, as part of a larger package of measures to strengthen the social dimension of European integration. The European social partners received the competence to become, in principle, co-regulators of the European labour market. The conventional reading of the evolution of European social dialogue since its inception is that it has evolved from a relationship of dependency of the European social partners on the European institutions for the implementation of their framework agreements, towards a more autonomous position in which the social partners have opted to focus on autonomous framework agreements and other ‘new generation texts’, including joint reports, recommendations, compendia of good practice, and so on, which are not directed at the European institutions in order to secure implementation. In this chapter we want to challenge and move beyond this rather linear and one-dimensional conceptualisation of the evolution of European social dialogue. Empirically, we will show that there has not been a straightforward move away from the ‘implementation through Directive’ mode in favour of autonomous agreements. Analytically, we will argue that framing the issue in terms of dependency or autonomy does not do justice to the complexity of relationships that are involved in the European social dialogue and the European sector social dialogue, and in the implementation of framework agreements and other new generation texts. Also it accords little attention to the role of power in the relationships involved. We draw on a multi-governance perspective to analyse the dynamics of European social dialogue, which allows us to capture the relevant multiple horizontal and vertical relationships, or interdependencies, between the European and national, and public and private, actors involved. Interdependency implies the presence of both autonomy and dependence in a relationship, and our central proposition is that these interdependencies simultaneously enhance and limit the capacity of the European social partners to make and implement agreements.

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Edited by Luigi Burroni, Maarten Keune and Guglielmo Meardi

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Edited by Luigi Burroni, Maarten Keune and Guglielmo Meardi

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Luigi Burroni, Maarten Keune and Guglielmo Meardi

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Economy and Society in Europe

A Relationship in Crisis

Edited by Luigi Burroni, Maarten Keune and Guglielmo Meardi

While an economy is always ‘embedded’ in society, the relationship between the two is undergoing profound changes in Europe, resulting in widespread instability which is emphasised by the current crisis. This book analyses these changes, and in particular pressures of intensifying international competition, globalization and financialization within Europe.
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Hester Houwing, Maarten Keune, Philippe Pochet and Kurt Vandaele