You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items

  • Author or Editor: Malcolm Chapman x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Peter J. Buckley and Malcolm Chapman

This content is available to you

Edited by David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

This content is available to you

Edited by David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

This content is available to you

David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

The Field Guide to Intercultural Research, published by the internationally renowned publisher, Edward Elgar Publishing, invites readers to follow 48 authors into their research fields in nearly 20 different countries across the African, Asian, Australian, European and Middle Eastern regions. In 26 chapters, in addition to both a preface and an afterword, the authors who are representing more than 20 nationalities, narrate their experiences with solving intercultural challenges encountered during fieldwork - predominantly overseas but also in the home country.

You do not have access to this content

Edited by David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

You do not have access to this content

Edited by David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

This informative Field Guide to Intercultural Research is specifically designed to be used in the field, guiding the reader away from pitfalls and towards best practice. It shares valuable fieldwork challenges and experiences, as well as insights into key methodological debates and practical recommendations relevant to both new and seasoned researchers.
You do not have access to this content

Malcolm Chapman, Hanna Gajewska-De Mattos and Christos Antoniou

You do not have access to this content

Peter J. Buckley, Malcolm Chapman, Jeremy Clegg and Hanna Gajewska-De Mattos

The purpose of this paper is to examine ways in which cross-cultural research in international business can use emic-etic approaches more effectively. The majority of research conducted in the field has been etic, while the cross-cultural data used by the researchers have been emic in nature. This resulted in producing ethnocentric results which are biased towards Western perspectives. We call for a re-evaluation of the importance of in-depth qualitative analysis in international business research. We go back to the origins of emic and etic in linguistics and conduct a linguistic and philosophical analysis of these termes to demonstrate that the emic-etic distinction is not helpful for adequately studying cross-cultural data.