You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items

  • Author or Editor: Mark Freedland x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Mark Freedland

You do not have access to this content

Mark Freedland

In this chapter three interconnected arguments are put forward. Firstly, reflection upon the impacts of migration law upon labour law’s conception and regulation (or non-regulation) of ‘informal work’ produces significant insights into the analytical complexity and imprecision of the conception and the regulation of informal work (the ‘imprecision argument’). Secondly, reflection on the labour-law-generated and migration-law-generated model(s) of informal work discloses a particular set of normative ambiguities about the culpability of the worker for being engaged in informal work which has very important implications for the ways in which informal work is regulated (or not regulated) (the ‘normative ambiguity argument’). Thirdly, some suggestions are advanced as to how to construct an appropriate regulatory response to those insights, canvassing some ideas for improving the worker-protective regulation of informal work in ways which are inclusive of migrant workers rather than unduly exclusive of undocumented workers (the ‘argument for inclusiveness’).

You do not have access to this content

Nicola Countouris and Mark Freedland

You do not have access to this content

Mark Freedland and Lucy Vickers

You do not have access to this content

Resolving invention ownership disputes: limitations of the contract of employment

Perspectives from Intellectual Property, Labour, Competition and Corporate Law

Mark Freedland and Jeremias Prassl

You do not have access to this content

Guy Davidov, Mark Freedland and Nicola Kountouris