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Mark N.K. Saunders

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Mark N.K. Saunders

In this vignette I consider the trial drafting and re-drafting of an academic article prior to publication. In it I reveal the process that a colleague and I, even though we are seasoned academics, needed to engage in to ensure that our work meets the standards required by academic journals.

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Mark N.K. Saunders

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Mark N. K. Saunders

For doctoral students, time as an actor may play the unstoppable clock counting down to the final submission deadline. During the early days of their studies, students may feel it is running slowly. This creates an illusion that they have plenty of time to complete their doctorate. Yet, as their research develops and their deadline draws closer, the same clock moves to centre stage in their lives and the speed at which it counts down appears to become quicker. This chapter begins by reflecting on the author’s doctoral experience, before turning to the practice of co-managing time, focussing upon thesis research and writing. Within this, the author integrates his experiences with those of doctoral students he has taught, supervised and advised, considering activities and associated realisations that have been particularly valuable. The chapter ends with a summary of these activities as six time-related lessons for keeping the doctorate on track.

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Mark N. K. Saunders

Recently, a doctoral student in her final year at my university asked me to read through her curriculum vitae (CV) and provide some feedback. We decided to look through it together whilst having a drink in the campus coffee shop. There was an occasional spelling mistake and places where information was unclear. The student wanted a position at a UK, research-intensive university, so we decided to look carefully at her CV from that viewpoint. For such positions, candidates with strong research and publication records as well as teaching experience are most likely to be selected for interviews and, consequently, the position. This student’s chances of obtaining an interview would therefore be helped if her CV emphasised she could (undertake research and) publish in what are often referred to as ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ journals, as well as outlining her teaching experience.

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Cinla Akinci and Mark N.K. Saunders

This chapter provides an overview of the design and use of questionnaire surveys in Human Resource Development (HRD) research, focusing on the commonly occurring methodological issues and associated concerns. These are illustrated drawing upon personal experience of four projects within a large UK public sector organisation.

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Edited by Mark N.K. Saunders and Paul Tosey

This content is available to you

Edited by Mark N.K. Saunders and Paul Tosey