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David Colander, James Duesenberry, Robert Eisner, Mathew Forstater, Robert L. Heilbroner, Richard Musgrave and Edward Nell

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Edited by L. Randall Wray and Mathew Forstater

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Edited by L. Randall Wray and Mathew Forstater

Original articles by leading scholars of post Keynesian economics make up this authoritative collection. Current topics of the greatest interest are covered, such as: perspectives on current economic policy; post Keynesian approaches to monetary theory and policy; economic development, growth and inflation; Kaleckian perspectives on distribution; economic methodology; and history of heterodox economic theory. The contributors explore a variety of prevailing issues including: wage bargaining and monetary policy in the EMU; the meaning of money in the internet age; stability conditions for small open economies; and economic policies of sustainable development in countries transitioning to a market economy. Other enduring matters are examined through the lens of economic theorists – Kaleckian dynamics and evolutionary life cycles; a comparison between Keynes’s and Hayek’s economic theories; and an analysis of the power of the firm based on the work of Joan Robinson, to name a few.
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Edited by Edward J. Nell and Mathew Forstater

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Edited by Edward J. Nell and Mathew Forstater

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Reinventing Functional Finance

Transformational Growth and Full Employment

Edited by Edward J. Nell and Mathew Forstater

This ambitious book seeks both to revive and revise the idea of ‘functional finance’. Followers of this doctrine believe that government budgets should concentrate solely on their macroeconomic impact on the economy, rather than reflecting a concern for sound finance and budgetary discipline. Reinventing Functional Finance examines the origins of this idea and then considers it in a modern context. The authors explore the concept of NAIRU and argue that modern economies can operate at the level of full employment without provoking unmanageable inflation. They also contend that budget deficits do not have the deleterious effects commonly ascribed to them; the belief that they do rests on a misunderstanding of modern money. In this context, they highlight the relevance of Abba Lerner’s famous dictum, ‘money is a creature of the State’. The authors also debate the merits of various proposals for ‘Employer of Last Resort’ programs, which combine automatic stabilizers with the buffer stock principle.
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Mathew Forstater

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Mathew Forstater

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Mathew Forstater