You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items

  • Author or Editor: Mats Benner x
Clear All Modify Search
This content is available to you

Mats Benner

You do not have access to this content

Before and Beyond the Global Economic Crisis

Economics, Politics and Settlement

Edited by Mats Benner

This timely and far-reaching book addresses the long-term impact of the recent global economic crisis. New light is shed on the crisis and its historical roots, and resolutions for a more robust, resilient future socio-economic model are prescribed.
This content is available to you

Mats Benner

This chapter introduces the main theme of the book: research as a global endeavour with growing financial commitments among governments, organization and companies worldwide, including outside the triad of North America, Western Europe and Asia. From this it follows that the politics of research is becoming an increasingly important, but also conflictual, arena where different conceptions, ideals and interests play out. These issues are identified and their theoretical implications clarified.

You do not have access to this content

Mats Benner

Chinese development in recent decades showcases the new global politics of research: from an insular position with virtually no visibility at all, China is now the second largest research producer in the world and a dominant innovator in the making. This chapter traces China’s political development from Deng’s famous speech in 1978 up to its very recent tendencies of research and innovation policy, highlighting not only the opportunities but also the constraints of China’s policies: authoritarianism and internationalization, political concertation and decentralization, among others.

You do not have access to this content

Mats Benner

This chapter is dedicated to India, which affords a similar but at the same time different story from China’s: similar ambitions to showcase the country as a scientific and innovative leader, but with a much less focused and decentred policy approach. The chapter traces the background to this in the colonial heritage, in the fragmentation of the Indian state apparatus and in India’s weak position in the global exchange of competence.

You do not have access to this content

Mats Benner

The growing importance of research and innovation policy is valid not only for giant countries like China and India but also for smaller countries and geographical entities. This chapter analyses the evolution of science and innovation in two of the “Asian tigers” – Singapore and Hong Kong – and investigates, in particular, the relationship between economic development, state-building and investments in science and innovation.

You do not have access to this content

Mats Benner

The United States of America has been the global hegemon of science, technology and innovation since, at least, the end of the Second World War. This chapter traces the evolution of US science and innovation policy, highlighting the importance of national security concerns and, in particular, the fragmented nature of the policy system, as well as the importance of universities not only as performing institutions but also as policy-coordinating entities.

You do not have access to this content

Mats Benner

This chapter turns the attention to the European Union, and traces the evolution of its science and innovation policy back to the 1950s, when European integration began in earnest. It then follows the policy evolution, in its upswings and downturns, until the current period, and points to how policy developments have been tied to the European integration process more broadly. Europe today is at a crossroads, with either further integration or disintegration, and this will also profoundly affect the areas of science and innovation.

You do not have access to this content

Mats Benner

The European Union represents only a small share of the investments in science and innovation in Europe, the main part being carried out via the nation-states. This chapter looks in particular at the development of science and innovation policy in the UK, but also to some extent in Germany and France. It concludes that the nation-state is still the most important policy level in Europe, and showcases the complex interplay between policy developments in general and science and innovation policy in particular.

You do not have access to this content

Mats Benner

The last chapter is a synthesis of the country studies of the book, and aligns those country narratives with the theoretical framework outlined in Chapter 1. It concludes with a global outlook beyond the nations studied in the volume, and argues that the new global politics of research will continue to grow in scale and scope.