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Boers Börje and Mattias Nordqvist

The objective of this chapter is to deepen our understanding of the nature of family businesses by analysing them as hybrid organisations. We define family businesses as businesses where one or several families own the controlling majority of the shares and are actively involved in the business (Chrisman et al., 2005; Chua et al., 1999). The focus of the chapter is on the theoretical notion of family businesses as hybrid organisations, and it draws on case research based on two publicly listed family firms. Publicly listed family firms are common around the world (La Porta et al., 1999) and they illustrate explicitly the hybrid character of family businesses by combining the logic of family ownership with the expectation of delivering shareholder value (Boers and Nordqvist, 2012). We argue that hybridity is especially apparent in publicly listed family businesses, where it arises from different underlying institutional logics related to the family and the market and the private and the public. The hybrid nature of this kind of business has an impact on their decision-making, their control and/or their governance more generally. To analyse the two cases, we draw on literature on hybrid organisations, governance and family firms. The study of hybrid organisations has gained momentum in recent years (see, e.g., Battilana and Dorado, 2010; Battilana and Lee, 2014; Billis, 2010; Pache and Santos, 2013; and also this Handbook). The current focus seems to be on social enterprises as typical examples of hybrid organisations (Battilana and Lee, 2014; Doherty et al., 2014). Yet this phenomenon is not exclusive to social enterprises or the third sector: it is equally relevant for some public sector and for-profit organisations. The most common type of business is the family business (Dyer, 2003), which also represents a hybrid organisation, with the two domains of family and business constituting the source of hybridity. Family businesses have been portrayed as hybrid organisations in previous literature (e.g., Arregle et al., 2007; Boers and Nordqvist, 2012; Ljungkvist and Boers, 2017), but the concept of hybridity has not gained as much research attention as it deserves. The purpose of this chapter is to address this limitation.

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Edited by Mattias Nordqvist and Thomas M. Zellweger

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Mattias Nordqvist and Thomas M. Zellweger

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Transgenerational Entrepreneurship

Exploring Growth and Performance in Family Firms Across Generations

Edited by Mattias Nordqvist and Thomas M. Zellweger

Introducing a new concept in family businesses Transgenerational Entrepreneurship addresses how these businesses achieve growth and longevity through entrepreneurial activities. It focuses on the resources, capabilities and mindsets that families develop and draw upon in order to be entrepreneurial across generations, and presents findings from an international research collaboration between family business researchers and practitioners.
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Edited by Mattias Nordqvist, Leif Melin, Mattias Waldkirch and Gershon Kumeto

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Edited by Mattias Nordqvist, Leif Melin, Mattias Waldkirch and Gershon Kumeto

Family business has become an increasingly studied field over the last decade and forms one of the fastest growing research areas today. The uniqueness of family businesses is the interaction between two systems; the family and the business systems, leading to specific characteristics that we rarely see in other types of businesses. In order to understand the interaction between the family and the business systems, researchers have adopted a diverse range of theories from different fields. The contributors provide a thorough discussion of thirteen theoretical perspectives that have been used in family business research to a varying degree. Each chapter introduces a theory, demonstrates its previous application in family business research and offers compelling ideas for future research that could contribute to both the family business field and the original theory behind it. This book aims to spark new insights for researchers and PhD students in the field of family business, and is also a good introduction for researchers who are new to the field.
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Anders Melander, Leif Melin and Mattias Nordqvist

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Annika Hall, Leif Melin and Mattias Nordqvist

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Alexander Meineke, Karin Hellerstedt and Mattias Nordqvist

This chapter describes the public discourse on the role of the chairperson of the board as depicted in newspaper articles from the United States, the United Kingdom and Germany. The study shows that the role of the chairperson of the board is presented in the discourse as undergoing change in recent years. We identify several focus areas of public discourse: the role of the chairperson, the separation of the roles of chairperson and CEO, the progression from CEO to chairperson position, and the German supervisory chairperson. Despite the uniqueness of some of the issues to the national governance contexts, there is a shift in the understanding of the role of the chairperson. Notably, the demands from both within and outside the organizational boundaries are said to be increasing. Shareholders and other stakeholders have heightened expectations towards the chairperson and his/her board of directors. The responsibilities have increased, and so has the accountability and exposure of chairpersons. The study identifies how the newspaper articles describe the way in which the chairpersons have risen to a more powerful position, which in turn has elevated the understanding of leadership within organizations and beyond the CEO. From the public discourses identified in the newspaper articles, we conclude that the corporate governance system today and in the future will require exceptional individuals that are willing and able to fulfill the demands that come with the job and assume personal accountability for an entire organization. Our study also discusses opportunities for future research on the chairperson of the board.