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Michael H. Morris

When student teams consult to emerging or small enterprises as part of a course or field project, few tools exist to guide their efforts, particularly tools tailored to the early stage context. Based on years of working with emerging ventures, the author describes the Supporting Emerging Enterprises or SEE model as a framework for use in capturing the essence of the business, establishing priorities in terms of business needs, and determining which issues the consulting intervention will be able to address. The model is proposed for use at the front end of a student consulting engagement. The SEE model has the students move through three levels of business analysis, termed the core, internal operations and resources, and the external interface. Key issues to explore are identified for each of these three layers of analysis. A number of analytical tools are provided for capturing key processes within the business.

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Edited by Michael H. Morris

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Edited by Michael H. Morris

A sizable gap exists between the ample demands for (and growing supply of) entrepreneurship education and our understanding of how to best approach the teaching and learning of entrepreneurship. To help close this gap, the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE) has identified some of the most important and provocative work on entrepreneurship education over the years, and worked with the authors of this work to produce updated perspectives. The intent is to capture the richest insights and best practices in teaching entrepreneurship, building entrepreneurship curricula, and developing educational programs.
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Michael H. Morris

Entrepreneurial activity is a means of breaking out of the vicious cycle of poverty. The poverty experience poses social and economic challenges that directly impact the choices people make, constraints they face and opportunities available to them. Yet, around the world, the poor are leveraging resources, starting ventures and building sustainable businesses (Banerjee and Duflo, 2007). In the process, many millions of people have been pulled out of poverty (Abraham, 2012). Critically, pursuit of entrepreneurship should not be seen as the exception – something that only very talented or lucky individuals are able use to uplift them from poverty. In spite of the substantial obstacles faced by the poor, pursuit of entrepreneurship should be the norm. Whether they are starting ventures that are part-time or full-time, formal or informal, for-profit or non-profit, entrepreneurship is accessible to all. It is a worthy path of self-empowerment, where the individual creates and captures value, addresses needs and can contribute to the fabric of a community.

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Michael H. Morris

Hundreds of entrepreneurship education programs have been established within universities over the past 30 years responding to awareness and the accompanying demand among students, among other stakeholders. However, as Morris points out, challenges regarding how to best design and deliver entrepreneurship education persist. In particular, educators—including scholars and practitioners—must balance the need to instill within students the notion that entrepreneurship is disruptive and requires creativity, while simultaneously emphasizing discipline, logic and rigor.
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Edited by Michael H. Morris and Eric Liguori

The second edition of Annals of Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy provides entirely new insights into a number of the leading issues surrounding the teaching of entrepreneurship and the building of entrepreneurship programs. Prepared under the auspices of the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE), this book features fifteen scholarly perspectives on a range of entrepreneurship education issues.
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Edited by Michael H. Morris and Eric Liguori

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Michael H. Morris and Eric Liguori