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Michael Roberts

This chapter aims to refute the arguments of David Harvey that Marx’s law of the tendency of the rate of profit to fall is not relevant to any Marxist theory of crises under capitalism. The chapter argues that, contrary to recent revisionist scholarship, Marx did not abandon his law of profitability or ignore it as a theory of crises in his later years. It attempts to defend the view that Marx’s law is logically consistent with his law of value; that the law is relevant to a coherent theory of crises; and, moreover, that the law provides the underlying explanation and ultimate cause of crises in the capitalist mode of production. The law provides a clear causality for crises that is backed up by a growing amount of empirical evidence compiled by many scholars. The nature of the law as a tendency along with counter-tendencies can explain the cyclical development of capitalist production better than any alternative theories of crises presented by Marxists in the past and David Harvey now.

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Michael Landesmann and Robert Stehrer

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Michael Landesmann and Robert Stehrer

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Edited by Paul Roberts and Michael Stockdale

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Edited by Paul Roberts and Michael Stockdale

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Paul Roberts and Michael Stockdale

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Edited by Paul Roberts and Michael Stockdale

Forensic science evidence plays a pivotal role in modern criminal proceedings. Yet such evidence poses intense practical and theoretical challenges. It can be unreliable or misleading and has been associated with miscarriages of justice. In this original and insightful book, a global team of prominent scholars and practitioners explore the contemporary challenges of forensic science evidence and expert witness testimony from a variety of theoretical, practical and jurisdictional perspectives. Chapters encompass the institutional organisation of forensic science, its procedural regulation, evaluation and reform, and brim with comparative insight.
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Robert Burrell and Michael Handler

This chapter provides a critical analysis of keyword advertising cases in the United States, European Union, Australia and New Zealand. It reveals that after a relatively short period of uncertainty, courts have shown themselves to be comfortable with applying or tweaking existing trade mark law doctrines, such as nominative fair use and ‘use as a trade mark’, to deal with some of the challenges posed by keyword advertising. It then uses this body of law as a springboard to provide a critical reconsideration of the right to control the use of trade marks in advertising generally. It suggests that when defensive doctrines such as nominative fair use are being developed and applied, much greater attention needs to be paid to the unusual nature of right to control use in advertising, in particular.

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Michael L. Barnett and Robert M. Salomon

Are financial and social performance negatively or positively associated? Extant theoretical and empirical research has supported both contradictory positions (Margolis and Walsh, 2003; Orlitzky, Schmidt, and Rynes, 2003; Rowley and Berman, 2000; Mahon and Griffin, 1999; Roman, Hayibor, and Agle, 1999; Griffin and Mahon, 1997; Ullmann, 1985). In this paper, we reconcile these divergent views through an empirical study of socially responsible investing (SRI).