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Miguel Martínez Lucio

Spain has witnessed highly innovative forms of inclusion and trade union strategies in relation to supporting immigrants. This relatively proactive response has mainly been service driven at the local levels and in the form of engagement with the social dimension of migration by the larger unions at the national level. However, a more direct engagement aimed at increasing involvement and participation of migrants is apparent in smaller, radical unions. Generally speaking, trade unions have drawn on their history of social struggle and experience of former national emigration. The chapter uses the framework developed by Marino et al. (this volume) that identifies the different ways inclusion and exclusion have developed and the causal historical and institutional factors that explain these developments. The level of innovation within the Spanish trade union movement is discussed in relation to the growing challenges emerging from a political environment increasingly focused on deregulation of industrial relations.

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Miguel Martínez Lucio

The chapter aims to explain the way trade unions have developed a range of strategies in relation to questions of stress at work in the public sector of the United Kingdom. The responses are outlined in relation to various dimensions: the relation between trade unions and the state, the collective realm of the trade union representation, the individual support and guidance trade unions provide to workers, and the social and community dimension of trade union engagement. Across these four dimensions there have been highly proactive strategies related to responding to the emergence of higher levels of stress at work. In terms of challenges, the following are outlined as being significant: the growing neoliberal orientation of the state and challenges to trade union presence, the manner in which employers and managers have tried to monopolize or abuse – on occasions – the discourse of well-being to limit trade union roles and to individualize the issue of stress, and the way organizational and political pressure on trade unions are creating barriers in terms their strategic abilities to respond to changes at work.

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Miguel Martínez Lucio

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Miguel Martínez Lucio

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Miguel Martínez Lucio

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Miguel Martínez Lucio

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Miguel Martínez Lucio

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Mark Stuart and Miguel Martínez Lucio

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Miguel Martínez Lucio and Stephen Mustchin

This chapter outlines a variety of debates on the nature of worker representation, especially with regard to unions. The issues of the purpose, nature, operation and changes in worker representation are an important dimension of the study of industrial relations. The chapter starts with a basic outline of competing views of labour unionism concerning whether its role within capitalist industrial relations is influential or tangential, and how. It then focuses on issues related to levels of worker representation and how it is essential to comprehend the different levels at which unions operate.