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Mike Wright

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Mike Wright

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Mike Wright

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Mike Wright

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Mike Wright

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Mike Wright

We live in a time of turbulence for academic researchers, perhaps especially so for those in management. Politicians question the benefits for business of encouraging management academics to publish in ‘obscure US journals’ (whether this means obscure European journals are acceptable or beyond the pale is left unsaid). Instead, business school academics are told they should offer more practical help to business. Pressures on internal resources from reductions in public funding and in income generated from executive education undermine budgets to support research. Sharply increased tuition fees for students shift the emphasis to delivering high-quality teaching. Also, submissions to journals have been rising significantly in recent years as a result of a worldwide surge of research activity. With space in most journals remaining unchanged, acceptance rates have been falling sharply and now stand at well below 10 percent, and closer to 5 per cent for major management journals. Thresholds to get published have therefore increased, with reviewers and editors becoming more demanding (Clark et al. 2006, 2013). Publication in quality journals has, however, long been recognized to be highly skewed (for example, Podsakoff et al. 2008); few scholars continue to publish in quality journals over a long period.

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Mike Wright

Buyouts are an important way to facilitate entrepreneurship by changing the ownership of existing businesses. Wright finds that buyouts can be used as a managerial strategy to encourage product and organizational, provide a temporary reprieve from the short-term pressures of stock markets and discover and exploit growth opportunities not realized under previous management.
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Mike Wright and Iris Vanaelst

There is a growing interest in the diversity and complexity of entrepreneurial teams because of their potential to shape new business growth. In particular, curiosity is focused on how entrepreneurial teams should be formed in order to allow new businesses to be created and therefore ensure their growth. This timely research review identifies leading contributions in this developing area and reflects a growing body of research.
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Mike Wright and Iris Vanaelst