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  • Author or Editor: Min Wu x
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Min Wu and Erica Xu

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Sui Tao, Min Zhang and Jiangyue Wu

Big data have become one of the most important information sources for urban transport research in Chinese cities, where rapid economic development and motorisation are drastically shaping people’s travel behaviour. Yet, a comprehensive summary and assessment of this body of research is still lacking. This chapter addresses this deficit by providing an overview of the big data applications in transport research in Chinese cities. Research is grouped into five thematic areas, namely, data enrichment and travel-behaviour mining, understanding variability of travel behaviour, transport system assessment and planning, evaluating urban structure and function, and environmental and social implications of transport and mobility. Overall, it is argued that the existing literature has substantially extended our understanding of the urban system and mobility in Chinese cities. Methodological advancement concerning big data manipulation and analysis has also been observed. However, certain important limitations, including data validation and sample representativeness, remain largely unresolved. Furthermore, theoretical contributions have been relatively limited. A series of avenues have been identified as a starting point for developing future big-data transport research in China and beyond, including more research in medium and small-sized Chinese cities, multimodal transport system and mobility, pedestrian travel behaviour, linkage between residential and daily travel behaviour, and finally, attitudinal dimensions of travel behaviour.

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You-hua Liu, Min Xu and Bin-wu Qin

Recently, parties have begun to implement patents separately to avoid legal liability in China. Multi-party infringing behaviours are more complicated to legally characterize than single-party patent infringement. Before the recently proposed legislative reform, the Patent Law of China did not clearly define indirect infringement. Chinese courts usually apply the joint torts rules to deal with those cases. However, by mixing the rule of joint injurious act with the rule of indirect patent infringement, the courts tend to confuse the two. Moreover, the newly drafted Revision of Patent Law, though it proposes adopting the indirect infringement concept, still borrows the joint torts rules to allocate liabilities. In these circumstances, it is necessary to clarify the relationship between joint torts and indirect infringement, and thus to clarify the rules for multi-party patent infringement.

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Antonio Balaguer, Yu-Ling Luo, Min-Hua Tsai, Yee-Yeen Chu and Feng-Shang Wu