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Ylenia Brilli, Nevena Kulic and Moris Triventi

This chapter focuses on socio-economic determinants of the use of formal childcare for children below 24 months old in Italy. Beyond looking at the overall relationship between family social position and childcare arrangements, the chapter also investigates the variation in childcare use over time, and across the Italian territory. We rely on the data from three waves of the Italian Survey of Births for 2002, 2005, and 2012. The chapter concludes that there is an important socio-economic inequality in the use of early infant care in Italy: both mother’s education and father’s occupation have a bearing on the use of childcare, although mother’s education appears to be more relevant. Also, there is a growth of socio-economic differences in participation in the formal infant care over time, which is particularly evident in the Northern regions in comparison to the South. The expansion of mostly private formal childcare supply from 2002 to 2012, which took place particularly in the North of the country, is offered as a tentative explanation for these trends.

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Edited by Hans-Peter Blossfeld, Jan Skopek, Moris Triventi and Sandra Buchholz

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Edited by Hans-Peter Blossfeld, Jan Skopek, Moris Triventi and Sandra Buchholz

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Gender, Education and Employment

An International Comparison of School-to-Work Transitions

Edited by Hans-Peter Blossfeld, Jan Skopek, Moris Triventi and Sandra Buchholz

For much of the twentieth century, women lagged considerably behind men in their educational attainment. However, in recent decades, young women have become an important source of human capital for labor markets in modern societies, as well as potential competitors to the male workforce. This book asks whether or not women have been able to convert their educational success into gains on the labor market
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Edited by Hans-Peter Blossfeld, Sandra Buchholz, Jan Skopek and Moris Triventi

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Edited by Hans-Peter Blossfeld, Sandra Buchholz, Jan Skopek and Moris Triventi

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Moris Triventi, Nevena Kulic, Jan Skopek and Hans-Peter Blossfeld

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Edited by Hans-Peter Blossfeld, Sandra Buchholz, Jan Skopek and Moris Triventi

From an international comparative perspective, this third book in the prestigious eduLIFE Lifelong Learning series provides a thorough investigation into how social inequalities arise during individuals’ secondary schooling careers. Paying particular attention to the role of social origin and prior performance, it focuses on tracking and differentiation in secondary schooling examining the short- and long-term effects on inequality of opportunities. It looks at ways in which differentiation in secondary education might produce and reproduce social inequalities in educational opportunities and educational attainment. The international perspective allows illuminating comparison in light of the different models, rules and procedures that regulate admission selection and learning in different countries.
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Edited by Hans-Peter Blossfeld, Nevena Kulic, Jan Skopek and Moris Triventi