You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items

  • Author or Editor: Neal M. Ashkanasy x
Clear All Modify Search
This content is available to you

Neal M. Ashkanasy and Cary Cooper

You do not have access to this content

Edited by Neal M. Ashkanasy and Cary L. Cooper

This Companion brings together many leading scholars to address a wide range of topics in 38 chapters, across five levels of organizational analysis – including within-person, between-person (individual differences), relationships, groups, and the organization as a whole. Chapters tackle structure and measurement of emotion, antecedents and consequences of positive and negative emotions, including effects on work satisfaction and performance. The expression, recognition, and regulation of emotion and the propagation of mood and emotion in groups are also dealt with. The Companion explores contemporary issues including leadership, organizational climate and culture, as well as organizational change.
You do not have access to this content

Herman H.M. Tse and Neal M. Ashkanasy

You do not have access to this content

March L. To, Neal M Ashkanasy and Cynthia D. Fisher

You do not have access to this content

Marissa S. Edwards, Sandra A. Lawrence and Neal M. Ashkanasy

You do not have access to this content

Oluremi B. Ayoko, Neal M. Ashkanasy and Karen A. Jehn

This chapter is structured in two parts. In the first part, based on the tenets of affective events theory (AET) (Weiss and Cropanzano, 1996), we argue that employees’ territoriality shapes the course of their experiences of conflict and emotions, and ultimately their wellbeing – especially where employees occupy a common workspace (that is, the open-plan office). In the second part of this chapter, and given that territoriality is a relatively new construct in organizational behavior (OB) literature (Ayoko et al., 2010), we review research into the effects of the office environment on employees especially paying attention to the different methodological approaches used in the studies reviewed. In particular, we note that research has rarely addressed the nexus of workspace, conflict, and emotions; and suggest opportunities to incorporate these variables into future research.
You do not have access to this content

Edited by Oluremi B. Ayoko, Neal M. Ashkanasy and Karen A. Jehn

This unique book draws together current thoughts and research in conflict management. Specifically, it brings a wealth of knowledge from authorities in the field on emerging issues such as power in conflict, cognition and emotions in conflict, leading conflict from multiple perspectives and cultural orientations, the role of context in conflict and the teaching of conflict management. Altogether, the Handbook provides a critical avenue for researchers and practitioners’ continued engagement in conflict research and management theory.
This content is available to you

Edited by Oluremi B. Ayoko, Neal M. Ashkanasy and Karen A. Jehn

You do not have access to this content

Mathew L. A. Hayward, Neal M. Ashkanasy and Robert A. Baron

Despite its importance in predicting employee performance and satisfaction, pride in work has to date been a neglected emotion in organizational studies. Part of this neglect is most likely because commentators differ as to whether pride has generally constructive or deleterious effects on work behavior and attitudes. In this chapter, we argue that these contrasting predictions can be resolved by distinguishing two unique types of pride: pride in an actor’s efforts (authentic pride) or unwarranted pride in own capabilities (hubristic pride). Based upon this distinction, we develop selective implications for employee performance. We also propose that emotional self-regulation processes can determine whether employees experience authentic pride or hubristic pride.