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Ngai-Ling Sum

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Ngai-Ling Sum

This entry locates the production of China’s new trans-regional scale of One Belt One Road (OBOR) in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis. In response to falling exports and unemployment, the Chinese leadership launched a four trillion Renminbi stimulus package which intensified its property, infrastructure and, later, the financial asset bubbles between 2010 and 2015. This crisis-pronged period coincided with the transfer of leadership and in anticipation of falling growth rate, it promotes a new trans-regional imaginary of OBOR with the hope of displacing its excess capacities abroad. The entry examines these changes via a discursive-material approach. First, it examines the discursive production of this new scale via the construction and negotiation of geoeconomic and geopolitical tropes. Second, it examines how this body of knowledge contributes towards the making of two inter-related governance configurations which form the bases for an emerging but contradictory infrastructural–infocommunication–finance complex in the shadow of global capitalism.

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Ngai-Ling Sum and Bob Jessop

This chapter introduces cultural political economy as one among several approaches that explore the interconnected semiotic and structural aspects of social life. The CPE approach belongs in the camp of ‘grand theories’ that, inter alia, offers a preliminary set of basic and sensitizing concepts and positive guidelines that are relevant to historical description, hermeneutic interpretation, and causal explanation. It combines critical, historically sensitive, semiotic analyses with concepts from heterodox evolutionary and institutional political economy. It aims thereby to overcome the often compartmentalized analysis of semiosis/culture and structuration/institutions by integrating semiosis into political economy and applying evolutionary and institutional analyses to semiosis. This has important implications for understanding the limits of constructivist and structuralist analyses; lived experience and lesson-drawing; the relations among polity, politics and policy; and specific fields of public policy. Each of these themes is explored in appropriate detail. Finally, by combining specific concepts and analyses bearing on semiosis and structuration, CPE can also provide the basis for critiques of ideology and domination. This offers more solid foundations to understand ideology and ideological effects as well as forms of social domination and contributing thereby to critical policy studies.
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Boxes and figures

Putting Culture in its Place in Political Economy

Ngai-Ling Sum and Bob Jessop

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Preface

Putting Culture in its Place in Political Economy

Ngai-Ling Sum and Bob Jessop

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Acknowledgements

Putting Culture in its Place in Political Economy

Ngai-Ling Sum and Bob Jessop

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Introduction

Putting Culture in its Place in Political Economy

Ngai-Ling Sum and Bob Jessop

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Institutional turns and beyond in political economy

Putting Culture in its Place in Political Economy

Ngai-Ling Sum and Bob Jessop