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Nicolas Papadopoulos

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Nicolas Papadopoulos and Louise A. Heslop

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Edited by Nicolas Papadopoulos and Mark Cleveland

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Nicolas Papadopoulos and Mark Cleveland

We have made elsewhere the claim that ‘place’ is an omnipresent, central, and critical part of human life, and one of many sources on the Internet (www.rhymezone .com, 2020) conveniently provides a partial list of no fewer than 486 common phrases that include ‘place’ and help to show how true that claim is.

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Nicolas Papadopoulos and Mark Cleveland

Both ‚Äòplace‚Äô oriented and ‚Äòcountry‚Äô oriented scholars in research, and practitioners when strategizing, use a large variety of concepts, constructs, ideas, and insights in their work. However, even though both groups deal with the same subject ‚Ä" the image and marketing/branding of a place, each group uses different sets of these elements and to paraphrase Kipling, ‚Äòthe twain seldom meet‚Äô. This chapter examines those that are used mostly or only in the ‚Äòplace‚Äô or ‚Äòcountry‚Äô contexts (e.g., respectively, parochialism, belongingness, attachment, or co-production, with an emphasis on residents or attracting tourists, versus ethnocentrism, xenophobia, patriotism, or animosity, with an emphasis on the origin of products or attracting investors) and suggests how and why ‚Äòthe twain should and can meet‚Äô.

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Mark Cleveland and Nicolas Papadopoulos

This chapter focuses on the social identity side of place and its effects. Using space analogies and planetary metaphors, it describes the intersection of consumers’ sense of themselves that is derived in part from place and how their social identity informs their consumption constellations of products and brands. The chapter reviews the literature on the self- and place-connected identities, explains how ingroup and outgroup social identities help generate brand constellations by informing product needs and shaping brand preferences, and examines the interaction and collisions among various social identities and places and their effects on consumer behavior. The concluding discussion focuses on applications of the concept and identifies avenues for further research.

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Edited by Nicolas Papadopoulos and Mark Cleveland

The core objective of this book was to bring together the broad range of research on place, specifically associations with, attachments to, and the marketing of places: from place and nation branding to tourism destination image, and from a product‚Ä"place perspective (e.g., brand/country of origin) to a person-place perspective (e.g., connection, identity, and belongingness). Throwing caution to the wind, we metaphorically charted a course between Scylla and Charybdis: perhaps recklessly, like contemporary versions of Captain Ahab and Captain Bligh, we as editors and our contributors as subject experts navigated within and across different oceans of scholarship and knowledge. The task was to steer the allegorical Ship of State, much like the ‚Äòship on a course‚Äô it symbolizes (Merriam-Webster, 2020), through typically hard and often dangerous waters.

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Edited by Nicolas Papadopoulos and Mark Cleveland

This book integrates new thinking on the image, marketing, and branding of places at all levels, from town squares to cities and countries, and of the products and peoples associated with them, thereby bridging the ‘country’ and ‘place’ silos in place-related research and practice. Insightful contributions from top scholars reflect fresh theorizing and provide a critical appraisal of conventional wisdom by juxtaposing intriguing contexts, questioning commonplace practices, and challenging methodologies and theoretical assumptions.
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Mark Cleveland, Nicolas Papadopoulos and Boris Bartikowski

Synthesizing the literature on how place-connected social identities interface with place-connected product dispositions across a range of situations, this chapter details the development of a typology of consumer dispositions connected to place based on their level of specificity and the relatively positive vs. negative directionality of affect. We then articulate a toolkit of place-related ingredients comprised of two hierarchies, comprising product-geographical elements and consumer-social-psychological elements, and postulate conditions when each element set will assume greater or lesser importance. The chapter concludes with several novel managerial implications that flow from our depiction of the place intersectionality of person-product-position.

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Nicolas Papadopoulos, Alia el Banna, Steven A. Murphy and Jose I. Rojas-Mendez