You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items

  • Author or Editor: Nigel Wadeson x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Nigel Wadeson

You do not have access to this content

Nigel Wadeson

You do not have access to this content

Mark Casson and Nigel Wadeson

This chapter proposes a new way of resolving some outstanding issues in international business (IB) theory by building upon recent work on global supply chains and the ‘systems view’ of IB. It views the multinational enterprise (MNE) as a coordinator of international supply chains, and reformulates IB theory in this context. This approach clarifies the logical structure of IB theory and reveals precisely where the conflicts and ambiguities lie.

You do not have access to this content

Mark Casson and Nigel Wadeson

This chapter offers an integrated analysis of outsourcing, offshoring and foreign direct investment within a systems view of international business. This view takes the supply chain rather than the firm as the basic unit of analysis. It argues that competition in the global economy selects supply chains that maximize the joint profit of all the firms in the chain. The systems view is compared with the firm-centred view commonly used in strategy literature. The chapter shows that a firm’s strategy must be embedded within an efficient supply chain strategy, and that this strategy must be negotiated with, rather than imposed upon, other firms. The chapter analyses the conditions under which various supply chain strategies – and by implication various firm-level strategies – are efficient. Only by adopting a systems view of supply chains is it possible to determine which firm-level strategies will succeed in a volatile global economy.

You do not have access to this content

Mark Casson and Nigel Wadeson

You do not have access to this content

Mark Casson, Lynda Porter and Nigel Wadeson

Internalization theory is usually applied at the firm level to analyse FDI, licensing and subcontracting, but this chapter extends it to the industry level. It synthesizes internalization theory and oligopoly theory. It analyses a global industry where firms innovate competitively, and freely enter and exit the industry. It presents a formal model that highlights the interdependencies between rival firms. Each firm responds to its rivals by jointly optimizing production and innovation through interdependent ownership and location decisions. The competitive outcome determines which firms serve which markets, which firms enter or exit the industry, and the internalization strategy of each firm.