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Nora Katona

This chapter presents Article 32 of the CoE Convention against Trafficking, which sets the general principles and measures for international co-operation under the CoE Convention against Trafficking. It begins with a short introduction, generally providing an overview of the main issues covered by the chapter. It then reviews the drafting history or preparatory work of the provision; provides a comparative analysis of this provision in the context of other international or regional legal instruments focused on human trafficking; and finally discusses issues of interpretation.

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Nora Katona

This chapter explores the Preamble of the CoE Convention against Trafficking. It begins with a short introduction, generally providing an overview of the main issues covered by the chapter. The preamble places the obligations of State Parties entailed in the Convention in the context of the important international legal instruments, which directly deal with trafficking in human beings in the framework of the Council of Europe, the European Union and the United Nations. It then reviews the drafting history of the provision; provides a comparative analysis of this provision in the context of other international or regional legal instruments focused on human trafficking; and finally discusses issues of interpretation.

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Nora Katona and Helmut Sax

This chapter presents Article 2 of the CoE Convention against Trafficking, which deals with the scope of the Convention. Article 2 declares that the Convention applies to all forms of trafficking in human beings. It begins with a short introduction, generally providing an overview of the main issues covered by the chapter. It then reviews the drafting history or preparatory work of the provision; provides a comparative analysis of this provision in the context of other international or regional legal instruments focused on human trafficking; and finally discusses issues of interpretation.

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Julia Planitzer, Nora Katona, Barbara Linder and Karin Lukas

This chapter focusses on the application of civil liability of companies as a tool to hold them accountable for trafficking in human beings for labour exploitation in Europe. Various legal regulations exist which should ensure that companies are held liable for exploitation and that workers have a possibility to claim unpaid wages from employers. The authors discuss liability for labour exploitation within one company and when liability takes place in subcontracting or in a subsidiary. However, practical application of these legal frameworks lag behind and exploiting workers remains to a large extent without further consequences for companies in Europe.