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Pamela L. Perrewé

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Pamela L. Perrewé

Publishing in the organizational sciences is not for the faint of heart. First, as authors, we all need to cope with rejection occasionally (sometimes all too often). If you are not used to receiving decision letters that begin with ‘thank you for your submission, however … ’, start steeling your nerves now. Second, many management scholars believe publishing involves unfair politics. Although I am not convinced this is true, I do know that prolific authors often are asked to contribute their work to a special issue of the journal or a book. Thus, prolific authors become even more prolific. Is that politics? I will let you decide that. The point is that in order to be asked to write for books or special issues, you will need to have a strong research and publication reputation. In this chapter, I help authors overcome rejection by learning to respond to reviewer and/or editor comments.

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Timothy P. Munyon, Denise M. Breaux and Pamela L. Perrewé

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B. Parker Ellen, Ceasar Douglas, Pamela L. Perrewé and Gerald R. Ferris

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Pamela L. Perrewé, Shanna R. Daniels, Kaylee J. Hackney and Liam Maher

This chapter develops a conceptual model of pregnancy in the workplace and examines multi-level factors that can lead to stigmas and discrimination against pregnant employees. The authors argue that covering demands, stigmatized identities, and perceptions of discrimination will lead pregnant employees to engage in concealing and covering behaviors at work. Societal factors which include cultural norms and stereotypes affect the organizational culture and the covering demands put upon those who do not fit the prototypical employee. When employees engage in concealing and covering behaviors, these identity management strategies can deplete self-regulatory resources and lead to feelings of inauthenticity which affect personal and work outcomes.

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Yongmei Liu, Gerald R. Ferris, Darren C. Treadway, Melita L. Prati, Pamela L. Perrewé and Wayne A. Hochwarter