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Paul Schulte

The development of drones and of global terror have been intertwined – both have accelerated since 9/11 – but their interactions remain disputed and mysterious. This chapter examines the nature of the dispute and the character of the mystery. Terrorists are already using drones and will acquire more as soon as they judge they are the best use of resources. Drone technologies are proliferating, simplifying and improving with little sign of effective international controls. As this chapter shows, however, employing drones, especially armed drones, for security purposes has special cultural and political complexities. It is inherently controversial, at least within twenty-first-century Western liberal democracies. The stream of decisions now required over drones requires recognition that they are part not only of a change in the character of war but of ‘A Fourth Industrial Revolution. . .characterised by a range of new technologies, fusing the physical, digital and biological worlds, impacting all disciplines, economies and industries, and even challenging ideas about what it means to be human’. This situation creates promises and perils. Governments face complex technical and legal decisions over regulation and restraint, alongside procurement and strategic decisions about drones in intervention. Yet, as this chapter demonstrates, it remains uncertain how important drones will prove in terrorism, counterterrorism (CT) and low-intensity war, compared to other rapidly advancing contested technologies like artificial intelligence (AI), cybe- technology, additive manufacturing (AM), and biotechnology.

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Edited by David Martin Jones, Ann Lane and Paul Schulte

This innovative work examines the concept of the informal network and its practical utility within the context of counterterrorism. Drawing together a range of practitioner and academic expertise it explores the character and evolution of informal networks, addressing the complex relationship between kinship groups, transnational linkages and the role that globalization and new technologies play in their formation and sustainability.
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Edited by David Martin Jones, Ann Lane and Paul Schulte

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Edited by David Martin Jones, Ann Lane and Paul Schulte

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Edited by David Martin Jones, Paul Schulte, Carl Ungerer and M. L.R. Smith

Almost two decades after the events of 9/11, this Handbook offers a comprehensive insight into the evolution and development of terrorism and insurgency since then. Gathering contributions from a broad range of perspectives, it both identifies new technological developments in terrorism and insurgency, and addresses the distinct state responses to the threat of political, or religiously motivated violence; not only in the Middle East and Europe, but also in Africa, South and Southeast Asia, and North and South America.