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  • Author or Editor: Paula K. Mowbray x
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Paula K. Mowbray

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Paula K. Mowbray

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Paula K. Mowbray

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Paula K. Mowbray

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Keith Townsend and Paula K. Mowbray

The notion of employee voice has been well established in the earlier chapters of this volume. In this chapter, the authors explore the important role of line managers in facilitating and managing employee voice. Despite the integral role that line managers play in contributing to a culture whereby voice is embedded within the organization, research on line managers and the role they play within voice regimes is an underinvestigated area. In order to better understand the line managers’ involvement in employee voice, the authors begin this chapter with an outline of and how line managers came to play such an important role in organizations. Critical components of the employee voice debates are examined before exploring in more detail the research that links line managers and employee voice. The chapter outlines areas that are underinvestigated or of growing importance in relation to the study of line managers and employee voice, including the obstacles line managers face, and how power and structure may influence line managers’ involvement in employee voice within an ever-changing work landscape.

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Susan Ressia, Adrian Wilkinson and Paula K. Mowbray

Jacaranda House is a not-for-profit organization and one of the first providers of aged care services in Australia. Jacaranda House is a large employer of professional, community and personal service workers who are employed across a number of sites in a major capital city. Jacaranda House has been in operation for over one hundred years, and the organization prides itself on its history of ingrained caring philosophies, practices and innovations that carry on to this day. Compassion and inclusivity is reflected in the organization’s overriding mission, they take pride in striving to be a welcoming and caring community, and have a strong emphasis on patient wellbeing. This requires significant input from staff in order to achieve an environment that provides the best care and attention to its residents. All staff are expected to uphold these organizational values and goals.

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Adrian Wilkinson, Ariel C. Avgar, Michael Barry and Paula K. Mowbray

This chapter calls for a contextualized study of voice as a way to increase disciplinary integration. In doing so, the authors propose a framework for assessing voice in the healthcare setting. Seeking to better understand voice in a specific and well-defined context highlights the need for more comprehensive frameworks that build on a wide array of disciplinary insights. The authors sketch out the potential of integrating some of the disparate literature to examine the issue of employee voice, using the hospital setting and drawing on the healthcare, human resource management (HRM), employment relations (ER) and organizational behaviour (OB) voice research. A broader approach to the study of voice in a specific context allows them to highlight missing conceptual linkages. They also use the hospital context to explore a new avenue for integration: one that encapsulates employee voice associated with patient care, that tends to be associated with the HRM and OB conceptualizations of voice; and voice associated with working conditions, that is more closely aligned with the ER conceptualization of voice. The authors discuss the reciprocal relationship between these two forms of voice, and their influence over employee well-being and patient care outcomes.