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Peter Jones

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Nasma Hannawi, Peter Jones and Helena Titheridge

The Gulf States have undergone very rapid economic and population growth, which has been accompanied by major urban development and transportation system expansion. The dispersed urban fabric and largely highway-based transport system have resulted in car-dependent travel behaviour, along with its various negative consequences. To encourage more sustainable travel behaviour, several cities in the region have planned or already implemented transit systems, supported by the concept of transit oriented development (TOD). This chapter examines how cities in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) region became automobile-dependent, and how recent distinctive initiatives taken by the Government of Dubai have helped the city to reorient its growth with the aim of becoming more sustainable, liveable and economically competitive, by integrating its land use and transit systems. As part of the study, the shifting attitudes and behaviour of developers in response to the planning and opening of the transit system are documented. The implications for TOD as a tool to encourage more sustainable travel behavior in GCC countries are discussed.

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Peter Jones, Daphne Comfort and David Hillier

Fracking, the exploitation of shale gas reserves, has become one of the most contentious energy-related issues in the world. New technologies have made once-unprofitable fields open to exploitation. This chapter examines fracking in the UK, a case study that illuminates the technology and politics of the procedure in many places. It situates British fracking within changing manifolds of global energy supply and demand as well as wider debates about energy security. It also explains the technical dimensions en route to understanding why many regions have adopted fracking. In the British context, it focuses on potential shale gas reserves. The environmental risks are explored at length, from local footprints to climate change. It also discusses fracking’s poor reputation and why so many people are fearful of it, which has resulted in heated opposition. Such controversial processes invite government regulation and planning, which are also summarized.

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Philip K. Thornton, Mario Herrero and Peter G. Jones