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Peter Leisink and Peter Boxall

There is a dearth of studies of HRM in a public sector context that examine the legitimacy of HRM and its contribution to public service performance. This neglect is striking because public management studies acknowledge that public service performance is a contested concept involving many stakeholders with different views on what good performance is. The chapter describes how the classic bureaucracy and the NPM models of public governance embody different logics of legitimacy that have affected HRM policies differently. The legitimacy of today’s HRM policies and their public service outcomes are examined distinguishing between internal and external stakeholders. The literature review shows a range of significant HRM-related issues, including job insecurity, role overload, and mixed progress in equal-employment opportunities. These affect the internal legitimacy of HRM as perceived by employees but are also endangering the sustainability of various public services, thereby creating severe risks for HRM’s external legitimacy.

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Ellen Van Wijk and Peter Leisink

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Edited by Peter Leisink, Bram Stejin and Ulke Veersma

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Peter Leisink, Bram Steijn and Ulke Veersma

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Peter Leisink, Bram Steijn and Ulke Veersma

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Industrial Relations in the New Europe

Enlargement, Integration and Reform

Edited by Peter Leisink, Bram Stejin and Ulke Veersma

This book presents an evidence-based assessment of the impact of EU enlargement on industrial relations and social standards in old and new EU Member States. It combines chapters which give an overview of the process of enlargement/integration and comparative socio-economic data at EU and national level, with chapters that present an in-depth analysis of the impact of European integration on national industrial relations. These in-depth analyses cover both a number of old EU Member States in Western Europe and new Member States in Central and Eastern Europe. The book combines supranational European, Western and Eastern perspectives on the impact of European integration.
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Wouter Vandenabeele, Peter Leisink and Eva Knies

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Eva Knies, Peter Leisink and Paul Boselie

The focus of this chapter is on the renewal of HR policies and practices that resulted in a High Performance Work System (HPWS) at the Dutch insurance company Achmea. As the majority of publications HPWSs are based on studies of Fortune 500 companies, mainly from an Anglo-Saxon perspective (Keegan and Boselie 2006), the case of Achmea is appealing for various reasons: a range of stakeholders were involved in the creation of the HPWS (a characteristic of the Rhineland model of capitalism); Achmea is not quoted on the stock exchange; and the role of healthcare insurance providers such as Achmea is subject to major reforms resulting from economic and political developments. By studying the HPWS presented in this case study, one will gain insights into the impact of various contextual factors on the shaping of HPWSs, the relevant characteristics of an HPWS design, the different actors involved, and their interests and the outcomes related to the implementation of HPWSs.

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Edited by Jeffrey A. Raffel, Peter Leisink and Anthony E. Middlebrooks