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Kristin Løseth and Peter Varley

Nature based tourism is growing worldwide, but its specific expression varies according to geography, culture and socio-political history. The jet-boats of New Zealand or the heli-skiing of the Canadian Rockies cannot, for better or for worse, just be copied and pasted into any national setting. Commercial mountain guiding is a narrow niche of the adventure tourism industry of Norway. Through a qualitative approach, this chapter will look at how the niche is shaped by changes in outdoor cultures, by the ups- and downs of the national economy, and by the juridical framework regulating the industry. While commercial mountain guiding is taking place in mountain regions worldwide, it is argued that the role of national and regional conditions in product and practice development should not be underestimated.

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Daniel Laven, Tatiana Chekalina, Matthias Fuchs, Lusine Margaryan, Peter Varley and Steve Taylor

This chapter introduces the SAINT project and the slow adventure concept. The core pillars of the ‘slow adventure’ brand include elements such as human-powered slow journeys, inspiring connectedness with nature, wildlife watching opportunities, nature interpretation, local, wild or slow food as well as the honing of outdoor skills. These core pillars (or themes) are highly relevant to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) involved in the SAINT project and constitute the essence of ‘slow adventure’ as a product concept. Typical nature-based activities available across the project area include expeditions into nature, overnight stays combined with nature experiences, wildlife viewing, hiking, recreational kayaking, canoeing and rowing, outdoor photography, as well as slow cooking and foraging. Most importantly, the ‘slow adventure’ product concept shapes the marketing message of the transnational cluster and brand, which companies can use to develop their product and reach the market. The chapter concludes by discussing the implications of these marketing and cluster activities within the Nordic tourism context.