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Edited by Peter W. Preston and Julie Gilson

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Edited by Peter W. Preston and Julie Gilson

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Edited by Peter W. Preston and Julie Gilson

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Edited by Peter W. Preston and Julie Gilson

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The European Union and East Asia

Interregional Linkages in a Changing Global System

Edited by Peter W. Preston and Julie Gilson

The global system has seen sweeping changes in recent years and this has precipitated a revival of interest in the relationship between Europe and Asia. This book examines the extent and nature of the regional linkages between East Asia and the European Union. Issues discussed include: the reactions and approaches of both regions to the Asian Crisis; postcolonialism and the balance of power in Europe-Asia Relations; trade relations between Europe and Asia and the revival of the Silk Road; and the development of the role of Asia-Europe Meetings.
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Peter W. Preston and Julie A. Gilson

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Sabrina C.Y. Luk and Peter W. Preston

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Sabrina C.Y. Luk and Peter W. Preston

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Sabrina C.Y. Luk and Peter W. Preston

The shift to the modern world took its initial form in Europe where a unique constellation of economic, social, cultural and political processes ushered into being the world of natural science, industry, states, nations and mass societies. The form of life was very dynamic, and it encouraged both domestic intensification and global expansion. When European traders reached China their demands slowly undermined the long-established, agrarian-based, bureaucratic feudal system centred upon the emperor. The collapse of the system was slow. European powers were crucial players, with their insistent demands for free trade and familiar recourse to violence to secure their goals. The Chinese elite’s eventual choice of a form of modernity was signalled by the 1911 Revolution. However, the revolution was beset by problems: there were internal divisions, a continuing foreign presence and, finally, civil war and outright foreign military invasion. The Chinese elite’s embrace of modernity only found effective form in the 1949 Revolution, the establishment of a party-state system and the creation of New China. It is the nature of the shift to the modern world that informs the logic of politics in China, and the argument presented in this book will contextualize contemporary Chinese politics in this fashion, granting that the present is the out-turn of events in the past and turning to spell out institutional forms (the party-state), political-cultural understandings (the national past, collective memory and the realms of everyday life) and patterns of policy action (ideas-in-practice). In this way the book will unpack the logic of politics in China.
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Sabrina C.Y. Luk and Peter W. Preston

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries a mix of external pressures from foreign traders and empire builders coupled to domestic structural change, including economic and social change along with an insurrectionary opposition, brought down the governing Qing regime. This ushered in a lengthy period of turmoil within China. The newly formed Republic of China was not a success, and those people with ideals, seeking progressive change, were sorely disappointed. Warlord violence followed, and it was not until the late 1920s that a semblance of order was secured in the period of the Nanjing Decade. That period too was suffused with the violence of civil war and, a little later, outright inter-state war with Imperial Japan, an exchange later subsumed within the Second World War. As matters unfolded the end of the international wars ushered in a period of renewed civil war, finally resolved only in 1949 with the establishment of the People’s Republic of China. This route to the modern world has shaped contemporary China, and in various ways these events have fed into collective memories, in turn, shaping, in part, the ways in which the elite and mass conceive their futures.