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Philip Martin, Lisa Scullion and Philip Brown

This chapter analyses the situation of Roma, a group of EU citizens that is often discriminated against and at the core of political debates on EU citizenship.

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Halina Szejnwald Brown and Philip J. Vergragt

This chapter considers how a cultural shift toward less consumerist lifestyle choices might originate, driven not by moral imperatives or environmental movements, but by the core pursuit of human well-being. The history of consumer society is a reminder that cultural transformation of that magnitude could occur in a relatively short period of time. We hypothesize, drawing on demographic and economic trends, that technologically connected, educated, and open to change millennials might lead the way in that transition. Their diminishing interest in suburban life in favour of cities, constricted economic opportunities, and their size and interconnectedness all point in that direction. We envision a scenario in which the core understanding of well-being will change through the combined effects of changing lifestyles, adaptation to the economic, technological and demographic realities, and emerging new social practices. Extensive research on well-being suggests that such reframing can readily incorporate a shift away from consumerist lifestyles. Government should support this nascent transition through policies that enable young urban families to thrive. They should also identify and foster other emerging cultural changes that result in more sustainable and highly satisfying lifestyles. This chapter is about the United States because it a global leader in the creation of the consumer society, with a per-capita ecological footprint about twice that of Europe, and with many emulators across the world. We contend that the US-grounded analysis presented in this chapter has relevance for other parts of the world, and that it can inform research and debate on similar cultural transitions in other national contexts.

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Philip Arestis, Andrew Brown and Malcolm Sawyer

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The Euro

Evolution and Prospects

Philip Arestis, Andrew Brown and Malcolm Sawyer

The authors offer a sustained argument that the single currency as currently implemented does not promise to deliver prolonged growth. They contend that the economic impact of the euro, and its accompanying institutions, is likely to be destabilising and deflationary; that the political impact is profoundly undemocratic and that the social consequences are likely to be deleterious. They do not reject the concept of a single currency but are highly critical of policy arrangements such as the Stability and Growth Pact which govern the euro. The authors propose alternative policy and institutional arrangements within which the euro should be embedded. They demonstrate that these would have the benefits of a single currency whilst avoiding many of the potential costs identified by detractors.
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Philip Arestis, Andrew Brown and Malcolm Sawyer

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Philip Arestis, Andrew Brown and Malcolm Sawyer

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Philip Brown, Andrew Ferguson and Peter Lam

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Philip Arestis, Iris Biefang-Frisancho Mariscal and Andrew Brown

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Philip Arestis, Iris Biefang-Frisancho Mariscal and Andrew Brown