You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items

  • Author or Editor: Pierre Benckendorff x
Clear All Modify Search
This content is available to you

Edited by Pierre Benckendorff and Anita Zehrer

You do not have access to this content

Anna Blackman and Pierre Benckendorff

There is substantial evidence that greater numbers of university students are mixing their studies with paid employment. The high rate of student participation in the labor market raises a number of interesting questions, particularly for those students enrolled in vocational programs such as business and tourism. Anecdotal evidence suggests that these students are developing a range of practical skills and knowledge about the world of work and the operation of real businesses. While a number of studies have explored the outcomes of placements and internships, there is little empirical research investigating what skills and learning benefits business students might gain from part-time work. More importantly, it is unclear whether students can easily connect learning in the workplace with learning in the classroom environment. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of part-time work in helping business students understand the world of work and in allowing them to integrate theory and practice. Business students from two Australian universities were surveyed mid-semester following a one-hour workshop designed to encourage students to reflect on informal learning and tacit knowledge acquired in the workplace. The results indicate that paid part-time work is perceived as a useful activity for developing a number of transferable skills, most notably interpersonal skills, teamwork and adaptability, numeracy skills, problem solving and communication. In addition, a majority of business students perceived some congruence between their work and academic studies. Part-time work appears to contribute to academic performance by developing business knowledge and skills that are transferable to university contexts and by providing students with a more grounded perspective which allows them to grasp abstract academic concepts more quickly and easily. If part-time work does have useful integrative learning outcomes for students and if appropriately designed pedagogy can assist students to integrate their experiences in the workplace with the curriculum then paid part-time work may be a useful alternative to more costly Work-Integrated Learning programs in business.

You do not have access to this content

David Airey and Pierre Benckendorff

Over the last few decades changes in funding and access to higher education in many developed countries have resulted in enormous changes that have impacted both directly and indirectly on teaching and learning. A shift in funding from the state to the learner and the escalation of university participation rates have resulted in increased scrutiny from governments, parents, students, employers and other stakeholders. In many countries government scrutiny has been facilitated by changes to regulatory frameworks and quality assurance processes. The combination of external scrutiny and competitive pressure has transformed the standards and quality assurance environment for all aspects of higher education, including tourism education. The aim of this chapter is to explore the background, nature and implications of some of these changes, particularly as they relate to standards and quality assurance for tourism education. The chapter will examine the notion of quality standards and will provide an overview of common approaches to quality assurance frameworks and controls in higher education. The focus is largely on teaching and learning standards in the United Kingdom and Australia, although reference will be made to other standards and countries. Attention is drawn to the performance of the tourism field against some of these standards and frameworks. Issues related to the development, integration and assessment of standards are explored and implications for teaching and learning in tourism are discussed.

You do not have access to this content

Pierre Benckendorff and Anita Zehrer

The aim of this original contribution is to evaluate the future of teaching and learning in tourism by considering developments at the macro, meso and micro levels. First, we review some of the megatrends impacting on the future and we use these as a foundation to provide a synthesis of the future of teaching and learning in tourism at the macro level. We also discuss meso and micro-level trends by synthesizing and extending the key themes that emerge from a number of the chapters presented in this volume. We attempt to extend on the work already presented by not only summarizing key themes but also adding additional commentary and analysis about the future of institutions, curricula, social and critical pedagogies, students and learning outcomes. Despite the challenges faced by higher education, we conclude that the intersection of two of the world’s most exciting post-industrial industries, tourism and education, offers many opportunities for innovation and disruption of traditional systems and models.

You do not have access to this content

Edited by Pierre Benckendorff and Anita Zehrer

This comprehensive Handbook provides an international perspective on contemporary issues and future directions in teaching and learning in tourism. Key topics include assurance of learning, development of skills, learning in the field, work integrated learning, sustainability and critical studies, internationalisation, technology enabled learning, links between teaching and research, and graduate student supervision. Within these topics attention is devoted to the discussion of curriculum, pedagogy, assessment, students, educators and trends and issues. The Handbook provides a valuable resource for understanding teaching and learning theory and practice in tourism.
You do not have access to this content

Pierre Benckendorff and Gianna Moscardo

You do not have access to this content

Danni Zheng, Brent W. Ritchie and Pierre Benckendorff

This chapter examines tourism performing arts development in China. It first reviews the scope of tourism performance arts (TPA) as integrating elements of both ‘high arts’ and entertainment. Subsequently, the market demand, motivations of TPA tourists and marketing strategies are examined. The chapter goes further to interrogate resident responses and social impacts of TPA. By integrating arts, entertainment and tourism, TPA has emerged and rapidly expanded across many destinations in China. TPA tourists seek to meet their intrinsic needs (e.g., aesthetic, education, relaxation or entertainment), or their social needs (e.g., a sense of bonding, distinction, self-esteem, social interaction) through art-core or art-peripheral consumption. Beyond the economic revenue, TPA helps to enhance residents’ cultural awareness, ethnic identity and cultural pride.