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  • Author or Editor: Ravi S. Ramani x
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Ravi S. Ramani, George T. Solomon and Nawaf Alabduljader

We present a qualitative review of the state of the field of entrepreneurship education in North America, in which we examine topics such as the growth of the field, its attempts to differentiate itself from traditional business education, and current learning approaches and methodologies used in the classroom. We supplement this review with an analytical examination in which we present the results of a cross-country survey of over 200 entrepreneurship education programs in the United States (US) and Canada. Our results reveal important similarities and differences regarding entrepreneurship education between the US and Canada in terms of course content, pedagogical approaches and learning materials used, sources of funding, and measures of the impact of entrepreneurship education. We discuss the implications of these results and outline future directions for the field of entrepreneurship education.

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Nawaf Alabduljader, Ravi S. Ramani and George T. Solomon

An overview of the state of the field of entrepreneurship education in the United States (U.S.), its attempts to differentiate itself from traditional business education, and the curricular confusion between high growth potential ventures (HGPV) and small business or steady state growth ventures (SBGV) is examined. This review and discussion also include an analytical examination of the results of a survey of 105 U.S. four-year colleges and universities that offer entrepreneurship programs. Our analysis compares and contrasts institutions that differentiate between high growth potential ventures and small business or steady state growth ventures and those programs that do not make this distinction across eight key areas: (1) program types, (2) courses offered, (3) course content, (4) student enrollment, (5) activities and resources available, (6) sources of funding, (7) pedagogical approaches, and (8) learning materials used. Although small businesses are by far the most popular type of firm in the U. S., our analysis suggests a relative lack of focus on a curriculum focused on small business or steady state growth ventures. Moreover, the results reveal a high degree of overlap in the curriculum between education aimed at promoting high growth potential ventures and education aimed at developing small business growth ventures, indicating that educational offerings have not sufficiently differentiated between these two endeavors. Implications of these results for the field of entrepreneurship education are discussed.