You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items

  • Author or Editor: Richard Weixing Hu x
Clear All Modify Search
This content is available to you

Edited by Ross P. Buckley, Richard Weixing Hu and Douglas W. Arner

This content is available to you

Edited by Ross P. Buckley, Richard Weixing Hu and Douglas W. Arner

This content is available to you

Ross P. Buckley, Richard Weixing Hu and Douglas W. Arner

You do not have access to this content

Richard Weixing Hu, Douglas W Arner and Ross P. Buckley

You do not have access to this content

East Asian Economic Integration

Law, Trade and Finance

Edited by Ross P. Buckley, Richard Weixing Hu and Douglas W. Arner

This book analyses recent developments and likely future paths for trade and financial integration in East Asia. It suggests a more coherent, balanced way forward for regional economic integration and analyses implications for institution building in East Asia.
You do not have access to this content

Richard Weixing Hu

The Obama administration’s ‘pivot to Asia’ intends to rebalance resources and strategic attention to focus more on US interests in the Asia-Pacific after a decade-long ‘war on terror’. But in the eyes of the Chinese and the rest of the world, it is also an effort to contain or balance against the rise of China in the region. The ‘pivot to Asia’ coincided with President Xi Jinping taking over the supreme leadership role in China. His response to the US rebalancing strategy is non-confrontational but also non-compromising in defending China’s national interests in the Asia-Pacific region. President Xi Jinping proposed to build a ‘new model of major power relations’ with the United States in order to ‘reset’ the strained Sino–US relationship. Washington was initially positive to the proposal but turned lukewarm later due to profound strategic distrust. Unless Beijing and Washington can find ways to reduce mutual distrust and manage competition, it is unlikely they will build an enduring stable and cooperative relationship.