You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items

  • Author or Editor: Robert Huggins x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Robert Huggins and Piers Thompson

There is a growing recognition that culture, both that specifically related to entrepreneurship and more generally that underpinning social and community activities, plays a role in facilitating economic development. Little attention, however, has been paid to the extent to which entrepreneurial activities are themselves resilient in the face of economic downturns: in particular, the extent to which entrepreneurial activities, attitudes and culture are supported by community culture at the local level. This study, therefore, seeks to address this issue. Data from localities in Great Britain are used to develop a number of indices based on those elements identified within the existing literature concerning community culture. Overall, it is found that entrepreneurship is only one element of the resources required to develop economic resilience, and may even lessen this resilience if ‘over-indulged’ in isolation. The findings further suggest that there is a link between some aspects of community culture and both economic and entrepreneurial resilience, in particular, a negative influence from social cohesion and adherence to social rules Positively for those localities with less market-driven individualistic perspectives, collective action supports entrepreneurial resilience, which means that such localities should not be handicapped in recovering from negative shocks.

This content is available to you

Robert Huggins and Piers Thompson

The field of regional development is subject to an ever increasing multiplicity of concepts and theories seeking to explain uneven development across regional contexts. One concept and theoretical tool that has endured and remained keenly discussed since the 1990s is ‘regional competitiveness’. Indeed, the rise of the concept has led to many frameworks and applications emerging and being employed in various contexts. Such variety has been both a blessing and a curse, with the notion of the ‘competitiveness of regions’ remaining an area of contested theoretical debate, especially arguments concerning the extent to which places actually compete for resources and markets. This chapter presents a broad overview of the evolution of regional competitiveness thinking, and aims to make clear the connections across a variety of contemporary regional development theories. The chapter firstly introduces the regional competitiveness concept and discusses its close association with schools of endogenous growth and development theory. The potential for measuring regional competitiveness is considered, before the chapter turns its attention to providing an introduction to some key contemporary theoretical perspectives on regional development. In particular the ideas of regional growth systems, institutions, ‘upstream’ behavioural theories of regional development concerning both cultural and psychological explanations, and concepts of regional ‘resilience’ and ‘well-being’ are considered. The chapter concludes by considering how the differing theoretical perspectives can be integrated, as well as providing an outline of the volume as a whole.

You do not have access to this content

Robert Huggins and Piers Thompson

Notions and theories of regional competitiveness are broadly cognate with theories of endogenous growth, which focuses on the role of knowledge as a key driver of productivity and economic growth, and departs from the traditional emphasis on the accumulation of physical capital. However, despite contemporary theoretical developments in the field of economic growth, there is a need to further widen our conception of the investment resources underpinning economic growth. Indeed, it is suggested that perhaps the most interesting implications of endogenous growth theory relate to the impact of the spatial organization of regions on flows of knowledge. In particular, it is considered that differences in regional growth can potentially be explained by differences in the conditions for creating, accumulating and _ crucially _ transmitting knowledge. The aim of this chapter is to propose that the inter-organizational networks underpinning the flow of knowledge within and across regions are a key capital input within regional growth and competitiveness processes. The chapter proposes that the concept of ‘network capital’ _ in the form of investments in calculative relations through which organizations gain access to knowledge to enhance expected economic returns _ should be incorporated into regional growth models. The chapter outlines the case and potential methods for integrating network perspectives into theories of regional competitiveness and growth, with the particular importance of the network capital built by entrepreneurs and their firms explored. The case of Silicon Valley provides some empirical insights which are then used to draw implications for regional economic development policy and future research.

You do not have access to this content

Handbook of Regions and Competitiveness

Contemporary Theories and Perspectives on Economic Development

Edited by Robert Huggins and Piers Thompson

The aim of this Handbook is to take stock of regional competitiveness and complementary concepts as a means of presenting a state-of-the-art discussion of the contemporary theories, perspectives and empirical explanations that help make sense of the determinants of uneven development across regions. Drawing on an international field of leading scholars, the book is assembled and organized so that readers can first learn about the theoretical underpinnings of regional competitiveness and development theory, before moving on to deeper discussions of key factors and principal elements, the emergence of allied concepts, empirical applications, and the policy context.
You do not have access to this content

Robert Huggins and Piers Thompson

A perennial question in the field of regional studies is why some places are better able to foster innovation and economic growth than others. In order to better understand the deeper and less transparent drivers of regional development, this chapter examines the behavioural and institutional determinants of the innovation and growth capability and capacity of regions. From the institutional perspective, regions are portrayed as growth systems whereby the availability of a range of capital forms and the quality of institutions play a key role in promoting innovation and growth. Alongside this, it argued that regional innovation and growth is contingent upon two key behavioural traits, namely: socio-spatial culture; and personality psychology. It is concluded that through the prevailing forms of culture, personality psychology and institutions, regions produce a spatially bounded rationality that determines the nature of local human agency, and subsequently the rate of innovation and growth.

You do not have access to this content

Denise Fletcher, Robert Huggins and Lenny Koh