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Joshua T. Beck and Robert W. Palmatier

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Todd J. Arnold and Robert W. Palmatier

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Stephen A. Samaha and Robert W. Palmatier

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Colleen M. Harmeling and Robert W. Palmatier

Relationships evolve over time, through encounters between exchange partners. Life cycle theories of relationship development that dominate marketing literature describe this evolution as a continuous process, in which repeated interactions and strategic efforts build incrementally on a stable history between the exchange partners. However, relationships can undergo dramatic shifts in trajectory that are important to performance and a single exchange encounter can have critical effects on this transformation process. This chapter explores both continuous and discontinuous relationship development. The authors start by identifying three underlying dynamic relationship constructs – trust, commitment, and exchange partner identification – and their importance in relational exchanges. They then review research on continuous (i.e., life cycle theories) and discontinuous (i.e., turning point theories) relationship changes, thereby specifying their unique drivers, underlying mechanisms, and impact on key relationship constructs. Finally, the authors discuss strategies for building and recovering relationships, based on both life cycle and turning point theories.

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Edited by Robert W. Palmatier, Christine Moorman and Ju-Yeon Lee

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Robert W. Palmatier, Christine Moorman and Ju-Yeon Lee

This opening chapter provides a critical reflection on customer centricity and synthesizes academic and managerial research, to develop a comprehensive definition of customer centricity. By introducing each of the subsequent twelve chapters in this handbook, this chapter also starts to clarify how firms can achieve true customer centricity. In particular, the chapters point to three routes for establishing a customer-centric organization: organizational design, relational, and brand and technological. A set of future research opportunities related to customer centricity concludes this chapter.

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Handbook on Customer Centricity

Strategies for Building a Customer-Centric Organization

Edited by Robert W. Palmatier, Christine Moorman and Ju-Yeon Lee

Drawing on the expertise of leading marketing scholars, this book provides managers and researchers with insights into the fundamentals of customer centricity and how firms can develop it. Customer centricity is not just about segmentation or short-term marketing tactics. Rather, it represents an organization-wide philosophy that focuses on the systematic and continuous alignment of the firm’s internal architecture, strategy, capabilities, and offerings with external customers.