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Roberto Caranta

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Roberto Caranta

This chapter links transparency and effective judicial protection. Transparency in some of its multifold forms acts as a precondition to effective judicial protection. These two principles combined, together with their corollaries and the rules adopted to implement them (including those concerning the right of access to documents), define the level of protection offered to economic operators challenging public procurement decisions by EU institutions or national contracting authorities or entities. The duty to give (or to provide) reasons acts as a bridge between transparency and the right of access on the one hand, and effective judicial protection on the other. In many jurisdictions, judicial review focuses on the reasons given (or provided) by contracting authorities or entities. The extent to which contracting authorities or entities must disclose reasons for their decisions together with the types of accessible documents define the material upon which courts base their judgments.

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Roberto Caranta and Paolo Patrito

Concessions as a form of cooperation between government and private entrepreneurs to build works or deliver services have been used in Europe for centuries. Public-private partnerships (PPPs) and similar arrangements such as PFIs are a rather novel development arising in the US and the UK in the last part of the past century. Works and service concessions on the one hand and PPPs on the other mostly cover the same kind of contractual arrangements but they are often treated as discrete phenomena in legislation and practice. This chapter traces the conceptual history of concessions and PPPs, highlighting the similarities in their legal framework and providing reasons why politicians and business scientists failed to see or at least acknowledge those similarities.

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Edited by Piotr Bogdanowicz, Roberto Caranta and Pedro Telles

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Edited by Piotr Bogdanowicz, Roberto Caranta and Pedro Telles

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Public-Private Partnerships and Concessions in the EU

An Unfinished Legislative Framework

Edited by Piotr Bogdanowicz, Roberto Caranta and Pedro Telles

In view of the fact that public infrastructure, health and other services are being more consistently delivered through Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) and concessions; this timely book explores these complex contractual arrangements involving cooperation between public and private sectors. It considers that PPPs have become increasingly prevalent following the financial crisis and examines the applicable legal regimes that are still, to a large extent, unclear to many.
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Edited by Kirsi-Maria Halonen, Roberto Caranta and Albert Sanchez-Graells

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Edited by Kirsi-Maria Halonen, Roberto Caranta and Albert Sanchez-Graells

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Kirsi-Maria Halonen, Roberto Caranta and Albert Sanchez-Graells

It follows from the CJEU case law that transparency is a general principle of EU public procurement law or at least a corollary of the general - and foundational - principle of non-discrimination. While this starting point is indisputable, how transparency translates into the rules and practices of procurement of the EU institutions and in the Member States varies very significantly. Harmonisation by the EU public procurement and concessions directives goes at times into much detail. This is for instance the case with the publication and content of the notice starting most contract award procedures. But much is left to the Member States while EU institutions apply discretely different rules. For instance, rules concerning access to documents of the award procedure and to the concluded contract are very scant or not given at all, and this is the case even if the remedies directives are taken into consideration.

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Transparency in EU Procurements

Disclosure Within Public Procurement and During Contract Execution

Edited by Kirsi-Maria Halonen, Roberto Caranta and Albert Sanchez-Graells

This book provides a timely analysis of transparency in public procurement law. In its first part, the book critically assesses a number of key matters from a general and comparative perspective, including corruption prevention, competition and commercial issues and access to remedies. The second part illustrates how the relevance of these aspects varies across member states of the EU.