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Roger Cotterrell

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Roger Cotterrell

Can sociological inquiries play an important role in addressing juristic issues? Are they debarred from doing so by a necessary separation of ‘is’ and ‘ought’ – by the divide between a sociological concern to understand social facts and a juristic concern to interpret and develop legal norms? This chapter argues that the fact–norm divide may not be an absolute bar. Much depends on the ways in which the role of the jurist and the scope of legal sociology are understood. While sociological inquiries cannot solve normative problems of law, they can reveal and explain much, not only about the contexts in which juristic problems are addressed, but also why these problems take the form they do, why certain kinds of juristic arguments may tend to prevail over others, and what the parameters of meaningful juristic debate are likely to be in specific contexts.

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Roger Cotterrell

This chapter argues that the range of authority claims now being made to support transnational regulation, and the kinds of legitimacy that these claims attract, cannot be adequately analysed in the terms that jurists usually assume in considering Western state law. A temporary distancing from orthodox juristic concepts is needed: to survey the range of authority claims now made and widely accepted, to consider how these can be compared and assessed, and to avoid rigid preconceptions about their potential legal significance. The chapter claims that Max Weber’s typology of legitimate domination can usefully guide a socio-legal approach that treats authority as a matter of practice and experience. Weber’s concept of charisma offers a partial template for studying kinds of authority that, at present, escape sufficient juristic attention. Juristic engagement with the diversity of forms of transnational authority now recognised in practice must base itself on socio-legal study of these forms and their conditions of existence. Only with the aid of such study can jurists gain perspective on the formidable challenges of negotiating a viable, shifting normative ordering of transnational regulation.

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Roger Cotterrell and Maksymilian Del Mar

This chapter offers a general introduction to the volume, offering summaries of the chapters, and general discussion of the thematic divisions of the volume.

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Roger Cotterrell and Maksymilian Del Mar

This chapter concludes the volume, offering more speculative reflections on the central themes of the book, including whether a minimal conception of authority for the purposes of transnational legal theory is possible / desirable. The chapter also consider the various methodological challenges of theorising authority transnationally.

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Authority in Transnational Legal Theory

Theorising Across Disciplines

Edited by Roger Cotterrell and Maksymilian Del Mar

The increasing transnationalisation of regulation – and social life more generally – challenges the basic concepts of legal and political theory today. One of the key concepts being so challenged is authority. This discerning book offers a plenitude of resources and suggestions for meeting that challenge.