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Edited by Ronald J. Burke and Julia C. Hughes

The hospitality and tourism sector is an increasingly significant contributor to GDP worldwide, as well as a key source of employment in developing regions. Drawing on contemporary research, this Handbook provides a provocative review of the major human resource challenges facing the hospitality and tourism sector today.
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Ronald J. Burke

This chapter sets the stage for the collection. It reviews content that will be addressed in considerably more detail in the chapters that follow. It considers the importance of the hospitality sector to a country’s economic development, the key role of service quality and human resource management in organizational success, leadership competencies, job stress and emotional labor, work–family conflict, sexual harassment, gender issues, generational differences, employees with disabilities, and ongoing and new human resource management challenges facing this sector. A range of human resource initiatives are then described that address many of these challenges.

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Ronald J. Burke

This chapter emphasizes the role of leadership in the success of hospitality organizations; why leadership matters; reviews both transformational and transactional leadership; and describes two studies of the potential benefits of servant leadership and empowering leadership. In these studies data were collected from large samples of front-line service workers in four- and five-star hotels in Turkey using questionnaires. Outcome measures included job satisfaction, work engagement, service quality perceptions, affective hotel commitment, engaging in voice behaviors and intent to quit. All measures had been used in previous research and were well validated. Both servant leadership and empowering leadership predicted a majority of the valued work outcomes. Practical implications on increasing both types of leadership are offered.

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Ronald J. Burke

Organizational learning has been shown to contribute to organizational success. Individuals are the agents of any and all learning that takes place in organizations. Organizational learning will become more important as firms address new challenges. Organizational cultures can facilitate workplace learning, both formal and informal learning, with informal learning being the most common and useful. Results of two studies are reviewed. In the first, workplace learning culture was associated with learning opportunities and a range of important individual work and well-being outcomes. In the second, employees engaging in more voice behaviors in their workplaces also indicated higher levels of important work and well-being outcomes. Learning strategies, facilitators, barriers and learning outcomes are listed and practical implications offered.

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Ronald J. Burke

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Ronald J. Burke

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Ronald J. Burke

This chapter reviews a wide range of literature on the “sandwich generation.” Women and men in the sandwich generation are caregivers to their young and older children as well as to one or both parents while managing their own household and work responsibilities. Sandwiched individuals report high levels of stress – physical, emotional and financial. Most sandwiched people are in their 50s and 60s. The sandwich generation is projected to grow dramatically over the next 30 years. Employed caregivers need to make work-related adjustments to undertake care. One response is to work fewer hours. Women undertake more caregiving than do men. The sandwich generation is a worldwide phenomenon with wide country differences in the levels and types of support available to caregivers. The caregiving relationship is complex, involving gender of caregiver, parents and parents-in-law, ethnic differences, resident versus non-resident caregivers, and changes in the relationship over time, sometimes involving Alzheimer’s and dementia. But there are benefits to caregivers as well, including improved relationships, using skills and developing new skills, and generously giving to another. Organizations need to address increases in caregiving among their employees and develop policies and initiatives that support these valued employees. Examples of such initiatives are described. There is also a need at the country level to integrate employees, communities, employers, businesses and levels of government to deal with this increasing trend. Key words: definition of sandwich generation, strains and benefits of caregiving, organizational challenges, supportive organization and government interventions.