You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items

  • Author or Editor: Ronnie Ramlogan x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Ronnie Ramlogan and J. Stanley Metcalfe

You do not have access to this content

Andrea Mina and Ronnie Ramlogan

You do not have access to this content

J. Stanley Metcalfe and Ronnie Ramlogan

This research review charts the development of scholarly research into the theory of creative destruction, first posited by Joseph Schumpeter in the first half of the twentieth century. The editors identify seminal works discussing creative destruction and its effects at both a macro- and micro- economic level. Beginning with key writings of Schumpeter, the papers cover research into enterprise and innovation, the evolutionary market process, the empirics of creative destruction, finance and the consequences of creative destruction for growth, development and economic welfare.
This content is available to you

J. Stanley Metcalfe and Ronnie Ramlogan

You do not have access to this content

J. Stanley Metcalfe and Ronnie Ramlogan

You do not have access to this content

Elvira Uyarra and Ronnie Ramlogan

The phenomenon of clusters has attracted much interest over recent years, both from academics who seek to understand their workings and policymakers who seek to emulate their apparent success. However, while numerous studies have sought to examine their characteristics, their performance and how they may be supported, particularly in regard of those clusters that occur ‘naturally’, little evidence is available on the nature and the impact of policies that have been implemented with the goal of fostering clusters. Thus, policy learning in this area is sparse. We endeavour to address this evidence gap, by reviewing the evolving rationales underpinning cluster policy and the challenges associated with their implementation and evaluation. The chapter concludes with some general lessons and implications.

You do not have access to this content

John Stanley Metcalfe and Ronnie Ramlogan

You do not have access to this content

John Rigby and Ronnie Ramlogan

Governments throughout the developed and less developed worlds are increasingly implementing policies that promote entrepreneurship. These fall into two categories: initiatives that promote entrepreneurial values and attitudes, and initiatives that attempt to teach and develop the decision-making skills that are needed by those who might be classed as entrepreneurs or those aiming to become entrepreneurs. Policies and programmes are being developed for implementation at different levels of the educational system and also beyond the end point of formal education. Extensive private provision of entrepreneurial values and skill sets also exists, and there are links between what is done by government and by private organisations. This chapter considers the rationales for entrepreneurial policies, the forms they take, and their effectiveness.
You do not have access to this content

Elvira Uyarra and Ronnie Ramlogan

In recent years clusters have become an important component of the policy maker’s toolbox, particularly in respect of endogenous pressures for growth and innovation. Academic and policy interest in clusters has emerged from the observation that many industries tend to cluster and the ex post analyses of the economic and innovation performance of a number of high-profile clusters. However, despite the popularity of the cluster concept and the widespread use of cluster policy, the question of whether public support of clusters is effective, particularly for innovation, is an open one. This chapter seeks to address this evidence gap. It first examines the main arguments underpinning cluster policy. It subsequently focuses on a number of recent experiences in supporting clusters across the OECD, and further highlights the challenges associated with the evaluation of these initiatives and available evidence on their outcomes. It then reviews the impact of a number of programmes that are selected for closer scrutiny. The chapter draws on available cluster policy evaluation exercises and related academic literature to report on the impacts and outcomes, both soft and substantive, of cluster policy. Finally, some broad implications for policy are drawn, in particular in relation to the need for policies to improve their clarity and focus in their choice of objectives and rationales, the need to allow for evaluation early on in the process, and the use of flexible and adapted interventions that are realistic rather than a rigid cluster model, together with a more careful targeting and a better balance between a hands-off approach and direct steering of clusters.
You do not have access to this content

Paul Cunningham and Ronnie Ramlogan

Networks (as distinct from geographically co-located clusters) have become an important component of technology and innovation policy in several countries and at the supranational level. However, it has been noted that the issue of appropriate policies for network formation and development is not clear cut and that there is a need to clarify both their rationale and the available instruments for facilitating networking. The chapter focuses on the evaluation of network policies and their role and impact on innovation, particularly since innovation is now understood to depend on a variety of feedback loops within the context of the structured relationships that constitute the so-called innovation ecology. We examine the historical development of industrial network policies and their rationales, such as their later adoption by governments to address the policy goal of increasing the exchange of knowledge between actors in the public and private sectors. The range of typical policy instruments is examined and the challenges for their evaluation assessed, before proceeding to a review of the evidence arising from a number of important studies. We conclude with a number of general lessons concerning specific network characteristics from examples where particular policy models have been successful.