You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items

  • Author or Editor: Sameeksha Desai x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Sameeksha Desai

The coming Artificial Intelligence (AI) wave will be accompanied by new questions for research on entrepreneurship. This chapter identifies some core research agendas on (AI) and entrepreneurship, categorized around implications for firms, industries, and other stakeholders. AI can reshape costs for firms, which can lead to changes at the firm level around decision-making processes and capabilities, as well as implications for industry structure. I discuss some of the questions raised by these changes for other stakeholders interested in entrepreneurship, including support organizations, and for policy and governance. Finally, I discuss the risks of bias and the implications of AI related to big data.

You do not have access to this content

Zoltán J. Ács, Sameeksha Desai and Leora F. Klapper

This content is available to you

Edited by Sameeksha Desai, Peter Nijkamp and Roger R. Stough

This content is available to you

Roger R. Stough, Sameeksha Desai and Peter Nijkamp

You do not have access to this content

New Directions in Regional Economic Development

The Role of Entrepreneurship Theory and Methods, Practice and Policy

Edited by Sameeksha Desai, Peter Nijkamp and Roger R. Stough

The introduction of endogenous growth theory has led to new interest in the role of the entrepreneur as an agent driving technical change at the local regional level. This book examines theoretical and methodological issues surrounding the interface of the entrepreneur in regional growth dynamics on the one hand and on the other presents illuminating case studies. In total the book’s contributions amplify understanding of such critical issues as the relationship between innovation and entrepreneurship, the entrepreneur’s role in transforming knowledge into something economically useful, and knowledge commercialization with both conceptual and empirical contributions.
You do not have access to this content

T. Taylor Aldridge, David Audretsch, Sameeksha Desai and Venkata Nadella

Knowledge generated in universities can serve as an important base for the commercialization of innovation. One mechanism for commercialization is the creation of a new company by a scientist. We shed light on this process by examining the role of scientist characteristics, access to resources and key university conditions in driving the likelihood of a scientist to start a company.

You do not have access to this content

Utz Weitzel, Diemo Urbig, Sameeksha Desai, Mark Sanders and Zoltán J. Ács

You do not have access to this content

Marco Guerzoni, T. Taylor Aldridge, David B. Audretsch and Sameeksha Desai

Scientific breakthroughs coming from universities can contribute to the emergence of new industries, such as in the case of biotechnology. Obviously, not all research conducted in universities leads to a radical change from existing technological trajectories. Patents and patent dynamics have long been recognized as critical in understanding the emergence of new technologies and industries. Specifically, patent citations provide insight into the originality of a discovery that has received patent protection. Yet while a large body of literature addresses the impact of patent originality on various firm performance measures, we address the question of what conditions drive patent originality in the process of knowledge creation within the university.