You are looking at 1 - 10 of 52 items

  • Author or Editor: Samuel Cameron x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Sin

Samuel Cameron

This content is available to you

Samuel Cameron

This chapter begins the issue of definition of the field and its relationship to leisure in general. It is argued that cultural economics often suffers from the paradox of providing forms of analysis that are not very ‘cultural’. the chapter provides a review of the idea of cultural economics in the history of thought from Adam Smith to World War II with general discussion of pertinent aspects of neoclassical welfare economics. Work by economists in the Association of Cultural Economics International (ACEI) and in the Journal of Cultural Economics are highlighted in terms of the key developments such as Baumol’s ‘cost disease’. Attention is drawn to the increasingly empirical focus of work by these economists. A critical review of the field by David Throsby, in 1994, is used as a benchmark to identify possible progress in the research area. It is claimed that several of the items identified by him are still lacking in significant progress.

You do not have access to this content

Samuel Cameron

This chapter considers the policy relevance of current work in cultural economics and suggests that this is lacking and that mainstream neoclassical welfare economics might not provide a sufficient solution to this problem. This may require a ‘cultural political economy’ that is more explicitly normative and more geared towards the exploration of disastrous policy mistakes. The question of a need for a change in approach is discussed with reference to the impact of technological change, specifically digitization. An attempt is made to clarify the distinction between virtualization and digitization, which are sometimes confused in the literature. Empirical work in cultural economics is scrutinized along the lines of the ‘seven sins’ approach enumerated by Pham in an article on consumer psychology.

You do not have access to this content

Samuel Cameron

This chapter seeks to expand on the rational utility-maximizing neoclassical model as the basis for explanation of choice behaviour in cultural markets. Hence there is an exploration of rational addiction and social effects. Whilst there are many empiricial studies in rational addiction, it is shown that social effects have been less explored and are difficult to capture. The evidence on age, gender and race effects is discussed and is shown to be limited, to an extent, by the nature of the data sources. The key role of omnivorousness versus univorousness in the age and gender effects is identified. The conclusion looks at attemtps to reclaim the ‘meaning’ of consumption via culture, in terms of the Burning Man festival. Some research questions about Burning Man within the manstream positivist approach are identified.

You do not have access to this content

Samuel Cameron

This chapter seeks to identify where there are risks of stagnation in the field and where there is scope for progress. Prospects for more cross-boundary work with sports economics and media economics are reviewed. A precautionary overview of possible future use of meta-analysis is given where some difficulties, specific to cultural economics, are enumerated. The potential for more qualitiative work is reviewed with reference to the use of fully structured case studies. The chapter moves on to comment on the further development of the burgeoning work related to happiness or subjective well-being (SWB) in cultural economics. This is concretized in a discussion of an innovative cultural subsidy policy in China.

You do not have access to this content

Edited by Samuel Cameron

A Research Agenda for Cultural Economics explores the degree of progress and future directions for the field. An international range of contributors examine thoroughly matters of data quality, statistical methodology and the challenge of new developments in technology. This book is ideal for both emerging researchers in cultural economics and experienced practitioners. It is also relevant to workers in other fields such as cultural policy, public policy, media studies and digital economics.
This content is available to you

Edited by Samuel Cameron

You do not have access to this content

Samuel Cameron

You do not have access to this content

Samuel Cameron

You do not have access to this content

Edited by Samuel Cameron

Surprisingly, the field of leisure economics is not, thus far, a particularly integrated or coherent one. In this Handbook a wide ranging body of international scholars get to grips with the core issues, taking in the traditional income/leisure choice model of textbook microeconomics and Becker’s allocation of time model along the way. They expertly apply economics to some usually neglected topics, such as boredom and sleeping, work–life balance, dating, tourism, health and fitness, sport, video games, social networking, music festivals and sex. Contributions from further afield by Veblen, Sctivosky and Bourdieu also feature prominently.