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Sarah Jack and Mattias Nordqvist

This case is built around a conversation with three members of the Swedish Wallenberg family – a key player in Swedish and European business life for many years. Through five generations, the Wallenberg family have worked to build and maintain long-term business sustainability and innovation through financial vigilance, patience and purposeful business development. This case illustrates how these long-standing family values and traditions have been used as a platform to support enterprise and build sustainable growth and global expansion for companies of Swedish origin. Moreover, this long-term perspective to sustainable business activity has been driven through a family tradition of working for the advancement of Sweden and the progression of Swedish society through a vision of long-term responsible and sustainable ownership. The case gives concrete examples of how the Wallenberg family has achieved this through their family foundations support to various research and cultural initiatives.

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Sarah Jack and Mary Rose

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Alistair R. Anderson, Sarah L. Jack and Sarah Drakopoulou Dodd

Research has traditionally concentrated on formal kin involvement in the family business. This study investigates if, to what extent and how entrepreneurs have capitalized on resources embedded in the family, but beyond the formal traditionally defined boundaries of the family firm. Employing both quantitative and qualitative approaches, the study finds that about one quarter of our sample’s entrepreneurial network ties were kin, and that most of these worked outside the formal family firm. These ties provided a range of very important resources, both professional and affective in nature. Such beneficial ties extend the family firm without incurring the typical hazards of external linkages.

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Jeff Hyman, Fraser Osborne and Sarah Jack

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Edward McKeever, Alastair Anderson and Sarah Jack

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Alistair R. Anderson and Sarah L. Jack

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Alistair R. Anderson and Sarah L. Jack

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Allan Discua Cruz, Eleanor Hamilton and Sarah L. Jack

Women entrepreneurs are important in the foundation, development, and continuity of any family business. This chapter explores entrepreneurial leadership by women in the context of family business in a developing Latin American country. The concept of entrepreneurial leadership challenges traditional approaches to research in both entrepreneurship and family business. Both fields have been critiqued for a focus on individualistic or gender-neutral perspectives, and furthermore with limited exploration outside developed economies. To address this challenge, this chapter presents an illustration of the entrepreneurial leadership of women in Honduras, a Latin American country where their involvement has been largely hidden or invisible in research to date. Findings reveal that a close examination of narratives of families in business can challenge socially embedded gendered assumptions of entrepreneurial leadership by women in developing economies.

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Eleanor Hamilton, Helen Fogg, Sarah L. Jack and Fionnuala Schultz

In the 1980s, Lancaster University Management School (LUMS) started teaching entrepreneurship; the first dedicated unit teaching and researching entrepreneurship was established in 1999. Since then the program has grown drastically, and today offers two dedicated entrepreneurship master’s programs, a full undergraduate curriculum, and other related programs. This chapter walks the reader through the evolution and structure of these programs.

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Alain Fayolle, Sarah L. Jack, Wadid Lamine and Didier Chabaud