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Alistair R. Anderson and Sarah L. Jack

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Alistair R. Anderson and Sarah L. Jack

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Alistair R. Anderson, Sarah L. Jack and Sarah Drakopoulou Dodd

Research has traditionally concentrated on formal kin involvement in the family business. This study investigates if, to what extent and how entrepreneurs have capitalized on resources embedded in the family, but beyond the formal traditionally defined boundaries of the family firm. Employing both quantitative and qualitative approaches, the study finds that about one quarter of our sample’s entrepreneurial network ties were kin, and that most of these worked outside the formal family firm. These ties provided a range of very important resources, both professional and affective in nature. Such beneficial ties extend the family firm without incurring the typical hazards of external linkages.
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Alain Fayolle, Sarah L. Jack, Wadid Lamine and Didier Chabaud

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Edited by Alain Fayolle, Sarah L. Jack, Wadid Lamine and Didier Chabaud

Entrepreneurship is undoubtedly a social process and creating a firm requires both the mobilization of social networks and the use of social capital. This book addresses the gap that exists between the need to take these factors into consideration and the understanding of how network relationships are developed and transformed across the venturing process.
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Eleanor Hamilton, Helen Fogg, Sarah L. Jack and Fionnuala Schultz

In the 1980s, Lancaster University Management School (LUMS) started teaching entrepreneurship; the first dedicated unit teaching and researching entrepreneurship was established in 1999. Since then the program has grown drastically, and today offers two dedicated entrepreneurship master’s programs, a full undergraduate curriculum, and other related programs. This chapter walks the reader through the evolution and structure of these programs.
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Sarah L. Jack, Alistair R. Anderson, Sarah Drakopoulou Dodd and Susan Moult