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Servaas Storm

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Servaas Storm

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Servaas Storm

Milton Friedman's presidential address to the American Economic Association holds a mythical status as the harbinger of the supply-side counter-revolution in macroeconomics – centred on the rejection of the long-run Phillips-curve inflation–unemployment trade-off. Friedman (seconded by Edmund Phelps) argued that the long run is determined by ‘structural’ forces, not demand, and his view swept the profession and dominated academic economics and macro policymaking for four decades. Friedman, tragically, put macroeconomics on the wrong track which led to disaster: secular stagnation, rising inequality, mounting indebtedness, financial fragility, a banking catastrophe and recession – and no free lunches. This is Friedman's legacy. We have to unlearn the wrong lessons and return macroeconomics to the right track. To do so, this paper shows that Friedman's (and Phelps's) conclusions break down in a general model of the long run in which productivity growth is endogenous – aggregate demand is driving everything again, short and long.

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C.W.M. Naastepad and Servaas Storm

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Edited by Servaas Storm and C. W.M. Naastepad

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Edited by Servaas Storm and C. W.M. Naastepad

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Edited by Servaas Storm and C. W.M. Naastepad

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Servaas Storm and C.W.M. Naastepad

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Globalization and Economic Development

Essays in Honour of J. George Waardenburg

Edited by Servaas Storm and C. W.M. Naastepad

Globalization is widely regarded as a means not only of ensuring efficiency and growth, but also of achieving equity and development for those countries operating in the global economy. The book argues that this perception of globalization as the road to development has lost its lustre. The experience of the 1990s belied expectation of the gains, such as faster growth and reduced poverty, which could be achieved through closer integration in the world economy.
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Servaas Storm and C.W.M. Naastepad

Higher real wages provide macroeconomic benefits in terms of increased demand if the economy is wage-led (as in most European economies) and of higher labour productivity growth and more rapid technological progress. Taking these benefits into account, we show that a wage-led economy becomes less strongly wage-led. The impact of higher real wage growth on employment growth becomes ambiguous. But for model parameter values which are realistic for the wage-led eurozone, higher real wages reduce employment growth. Contrariwise, real wage restraint in a weakly wage-led economy generates jobs – as recent European experience underscores. This internal contradiction in wage-led economies can be overcome if a high wage regime is complemented by supportive fiscal and monetary policies.