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Shiona Chillas and Alina Baluch

This chapter charts the development of labour process theory as a critical perspective on employee relations. It notes the substantial contributions made by this approach, identifying trends in the nature of work, skills and technology, also commenting on managerial regimes such as HRM. Careful husbandry has ensured that core LPT remains robust as the nature of capitalism alters. However, cracks have emerged, filled by importing and integrating explanatory concepts that stray from the core. Ongoing dialogue within the tradition continues to refine the scope of LPT ensuring its continued relevance in contemporary workplace research.

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Abigail Marks and Shiona Chillas

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Shiona Chillas and Abigail Marks

This chapter discusses debates within the labour process tradition on voice. It aims to review and develop the historical positions on participation and involvement that can inform new thinking in the field. The chapter starts with a brief history of the influence of labour process debate on employee engagement, in particular providing an outline of Harvie Ramsay’s work on ‘cycles of control’, a concept that underpins research on the labour process. Discussion follows waves in the labour process tradition, informed by key challenges, arriving at insights on contemporary working patterns including digital labour and new perspectives on workplace identity. The chapter recognizes that recent work within the labour process approach provides meaningful and robust conceptual and methodological contributions to research on voice, particularly in terms of the interrelationship between the roles of individual actors and broader structures in the articulation of employees’ workplace struggles.

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Henning Berthold, Shiona Chillas and Barbara Townley

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Henning Berthold, Melinda Grewar, Shiona Chillas and Barbara Townley

In this chapter, we examine how intellectual property (IP) engages with business models. Business models are conceptual devices constituting and framing the process through which things become assets or objects of investment, elaborating the mechanisms of value creation and delivery and the appropriation of such value through strategic means. Changes in the patterns of production, distribution and consumption in the wake of continued digitisation have come to challenge established value-generating logics. The heterogenic character of the Creative Industries implies a multitude of business models at play which escapes the rhetoric of universalities, reflecting locally defined understandings and practices of value creation and appropriation. Some of these variations are considered in this chapter.