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Silke Beck

This chapter explores the role of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in global climate governance. The IPCC represents one of the most ambitious and influential efforts ever undertaken by the international community to provide policy-relevant science. The joint award of the Nobel Peace Prize to the IPCC in 2007 underlined the authoritative status of scientific knowledge in policymaking on climate change. The chapter combines constructivist approaches to explore how and with what effects the IPCC acts as a politically powerful agent in climate politics even if the organization itself claims to be neutral and not policy prescriptive. Based on these empirical findings, it asks whether the IPCC is robust enough to address future challenges in a changing political architecture and outlines some of the questions to be addressed by future research.

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Silke Beck

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Holger Straßheim and Silke Beck

Over the past decade behavioural public policy has spread inter- and transnationally. Despite an ever-growing amount of literature, however, there are only few systematic studies on the historical roots and developments of the behavioural change agenda, the varieties of behavioural public policy, the causes for its inter- and transnational spread as well as its normative implications and political consequences. The handbook contributes to addressing this gap by mapping the terrain and bringing together scholarship from a wide variety of conceptual and analytic perspectives. This introductory section gives an overview on the main topics, the individual chapters and on future research perspectives. We suggest tracing the multiple ways behavioural public policy is constituted, translated and legitimized across policy areas and jurisdictions. This, in turn, is a precondition for understanding its role in the transformation of public policy.

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Edited by Holger Straßheim and Silke Beck

Behavioural change has become a core issue of public policy. Behavioural instruments such as ‘nudging’ apply insights from behavioural economics and behavioural sciences, psychology and neurosciences across a broad range of policy areas. Behavioural insights teams and networks facilitate the global spread of behavioural public policies. Despite an ever-growing amount of literature, research has remained fragmented. This comprehensive Handbook unites interdisciplinary scholarship, with contributions critically assessing the state and direction of behavioural public policies, their normative implications and political consequences.