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Silvester Ivanaj and Claire Bozon

Both technological and work processes are closely interrelated as far as virtual teaming is concerned. They are developed in parallel, on a push-pull mode. This chapter demonstrates why they are important within the process of virtuality, and why their influence on virtual team members is critical. It also develops the concept of collaborative work processes, and cross-references the processes mentioned in the previous chapter. It points out the challenges for virtual teams regarding technological processes and underlines the relevance of the contextual infrastructure.
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Silvester Ivanaj and Claire Bozon

This chapter explores the key role of the managerial process that embraces virtual team leadership and conflict management. It explains why e-leadership requires some different capabilities from conventional team leadership. More specifically, this chapter defines our understanding of e-leadership toward virtuality. It analyzes the perception of e-leadership by the virtual team members, and, the roles, responsibilities and competencies of e-leadership. The appropriate management styles for certain types of virtual teams are addressed along with their implications for effectiveness.
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Silvester Ivanaj and Claire Bozon

The socio-emotional processes include communication, collaboration, knowledge and trust-building processes, that are necessary to create performing virtual teams. These processes are supported by the infrastructure and are set up in favour of virtuality. We define the characteristics of each process and the implication of key factors for the different processes that affect virtual teaming. It is crucial to capture the socio-emotional processes because they directly determine the level of performance of the virtual team, both work process and affective performance, in close relationships with technological and managerial processes.
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Silvester Ivanaj and Claire Bozon

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Silvester Ivanaj and Claire Bozon

Teamwork performance is the result of team outcomes based on objectives and measures. Teamwork performance occurs at the organizational, team and individual level, confronted with challenges such as virtuality and the di_culty in providing meaningful indicators for evaluation. Relevant factors such as team motivation, cohesion, and recognition may create synergies and add value to global performance. These factors are monitored by key drivers that lead to teamwork performance, and are influenced by the structure of virtual teams, the sense of presence, theteam management, the composition of virtual teams, and the dynamics within the teams.
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Silvester Ivanaj and Claire Bozon

The degree of satisfaction plays a key role in the levels of affective performance within an organization, a team or among virtual team members. Affective performance occurs at the organizational, team and individual level also. Similarly to teamwork performance, affective performance is challenged by different factors, such as, the complexity to evaluate satisfaction within a virtual context, and the di_culty to find appropriate measurement systems. This chapter analyzes the impact of key drivers, such as, trust existing among team members, the team members’ attitudes and interactions, the different styles of leadership, and the way conflicts are resolved.
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Silvester Ivanaj and Claire Bozon

This chapter draws some final conclusions and makes some valuable recommendations.
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Silvester Ivanaj and Claire Bozon

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Silvester Ivanaj and Claire Bozon

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Silvester Ivanaj and Claire Bozon

The book Managing Virtual Teams, explores the critical elements that must be considered in managing virtual teams in organizations – from structural, managerial, and process points-of-view. Based in solid research, the book provides a deep look at the nature of virtual teams and the factors that enable their success. It lays out in clear detail the key characteristics of virtual teams and traces their emergence within organizations and the research literature. It makes a valuable contribution with clear guidelines for managerial practice - both to researchers interested in learning about virtual teams and to managers and organizations dealing with the challenges of managing virtual teams.